Livable Hawaii Kai Hui

Address
PO Box 25493
Honolulu, HI 96825
Contact
Website: http://www.hawaiikaihui.org
Phone: +1 (808) 864-8081
Nonprofit
NTEE: S20 - Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (General)
EIN: 26-0090676

Mission

Our mission is to uphold the integrity of the East Honolulu Sustainable Communities Plan which sets guidelines for sensible development respectful of Hawaiian cultural and natural resources that make East Honolulu a unique place to live. Protection of land through stewardship or acquisition and community education and engagement.
 2016201520142012
Basic features of the organization
Year of formation2004
Subsection code03
PF filing required0   
Metropolitan statistical area3320
Form of organization
CorporationTrue
Human resources, including compensation
Summary compensation info
Total compensation of current key personnel$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Number of employees000 
Number of people compensated >$100k000 
Number of volunteers470635921 
Number of highly compensated contractors000 
Personnel
Camp, Samuel
TitleDirectorDirector  
Name of key/compensated personSamuel G Camp IIISamuel G Camp III  
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrue  
Average hours per week working for org16.008.00  
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00  
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00  
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00  
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.000.00  
Carr, Gayle
TitleSecretaryDirectorDirector 
Name of key/compensated personGayle CarrGayle CarrGayle Carr 
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue 
Average hours per week working for org4.004.004.00 
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.000.000.00 
Gordon, Suzanne
TitleDirectorSecretarySecretary 
Name of key/compensated personSuzanne GordonSuzanne GordonSuzanne Gordon 
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue 
Average hours per week working for org6.006.006.00 
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.000.000.00 
Grey, Marian
TitleTreasurerTreasurerTreasurerTreasurer
Name of key/compensated personMarian GreyMarian GreyMarian GreyMarian Grey
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue 
Average hours per week working for org15.0010.0010.00 
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.000.000.00 
Kirk, Ann
Title DirectorDirectorDirector
Name of key/compensated person Ann Marie KirkAnn Marie KirkAnn Marie Kirk
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director TrueTrue 
Average hours per week working for org 12.0010.00 
Reportable compensation from org $0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs $0.00$0.00 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs  $0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs 0.000.00 
Reilly, Elizabeth
TitlePresidentPresidentPresidentPresident
Name of key/compensated personElizabeth ReillyElizabeth ReillyElizabeth ReillyElizabeth Reilly
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue 
Average hours per week working for org35.0035.0040.00 
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.000.000.00 
Roig, Suzanne
Title   Secretary
Name of key/compensated person   Suzanne Gordon Roig
Reportable compensation from org   $0.00
Shelly, Todd
TitleDirector  Vice President
Name of key/compensated personTodd Shelly  Todd Shelly
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrue   
Average hours per week working for org1.00   
Reportable compensation from org$0.00  $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00   
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00   
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00   
Tateishi, Allen
TitleVice PresidentVice PresidentVice PresidentDirector
Name of key/compensated personAllen TateishiAllen TateishiAllen TateishiAllen Tateishi
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue 
Average hours per week working for org9.009.006.00 
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.000.000.00 
Weller, Gary
TitleDirectorDirectorDirectorDirector
Name of key/compensated personGary WellerGary WellerGary WellerGary Weller
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue 
Average hours per week working for org4.004.008.00 
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.000.000.00 
Wong, Heidi
Title  DirectorDirector
Name of key/compensated person  Heidi WongHeidi Wong
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director  True 
Average hours per week working for org  6.00 
Reportable compensation from org  $0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs  $0.00 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs   $0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs  0.00 
Purpose: mission, activities, & accomplishments
Mission or significant activitiesOur mission is to uphold the integrity of the East Honolulu Sustainable CommunitiesPlan which sets guidelines for sensible development respectful of Hawaiian culturaland natural resources. Protection of the endangered native Hawaii wetland bird (alae'ula) at Keawawa wetland is of high priority for the organization. Growing native plants that were once prevalent in the area and out planting them at community restoration projects is a secondary priority.Our mission is to uphold the integrity of the East Honolulu Sustainable Communities Plan which sets guidelines for sensible development respectful of Hawaiian cultural and natural resources that make East Honolulu a unique place to live. Protection of land through stewardship or acquisition and community education and engagement.Our mission is to uphold the integrity of the East Honolulu Sustainable Communities Plan which sets guidelines for sensible development respectful of Hawaiian cultural and natural resources that make East Honolulu a unique place to live. Protection of land through stewardship or acquisition and community education and engagement. 
Primary exempt purpose   Our mission is to uphold the integrity of the East Honolulu Sustainable Communities Plan which sets guidelines for sensible development respectful of natural resources that make East Honolulu a unique place to live. Protecting the Aina and saving the beauty of East Honolulu.
Program service expenses, total$146,580.00$61,615.00$48,543.00$29,322.00
Programs, including revenue & expenses
In 2015 restoration work continued on the land (5-acres) purchased in 2014 (Hawea heiau complex and Keawawa wetland off Hawaii Kai Drive) for the protection of cultural sites registered with the State Historic Preservation Division and the protection of Federally protected /endangered alaeula (Hawaiian moorhen). Keawawa wetland also provides habitat for indigenous aukuu (black-crowned night heron), endemic pinao (giant green darner dragonfly), various species of native damselflies, and endangered aeo (Hawaiian stilt) thus the monthly water- and land-based predator control program started in 2014 was continued with Greyboar Wildlife Services. Planning and implementation of Phases III and IV of our Natural Resources Conservation Service conservation plan was completed (upland removal of invasive shrubs and trees and the planting of native trees and plants). Additional removal of illegally-dumped post-construction debris, residential garbage and more aged tennis balls were removed during Phase III work (upland). Over 350 native seedlings (Maunalua specific and wetland oriented for low land) were planted with 15 native trees upland. National award winning coconut tree Coco lost her crown late 2014, so she was taken down and shared with local halau and wood carvers for creating drums for future cultural ceremony. We spent over $6,000 to care for coco trees, and installed additional fencing between the heiau and newly constructed residential building to the west of our property. Approximately $30,000 was budgeted and spent on grounds maintenance for the Huis wetland, heiau, and agricultural projects. We continued contract work with a cultural educator for Pahua heiau and Hawea heiau as well as continued to contract a natural resource educator to facilitate eco-cultural education and activities utilizing Keawawa wetland and Hawea and Pahua heiaus as outdoor learning laboratories including place-based volunteer programs for students and the community. In 2015 we continued our fiscal sponsorship of Aloha Aina O Kamilo Nui nursery, assisted with their community projects and commenced with a volunteer driven program to grow native plants for Maunalua-based community restoration projects. In addition, we worked with volunteers to implement pilot programs at the nursery which include: honey (three bee boxes), mamaki tea (an entire greenhouse dedicated to growing mamaki), planting uala (sweet potato) in a mini (demonstration)rotational crop plot). We also held several agricultural oriented workshops at the nursery. During the year, monthly Community Volunteer Days opened the land to the public, including tours of Hawea heiau. Other guided tours were arranged as requested by the community. Cultural practitioners conducted Equinox celebrations, drumming and hula. Businesses and youth and church groups conducted community service projects. Volunteers were instructed on restoration practices, and school groups were taught science-based curricula. Schools / students that participated were Honolulu Waldorf School, Kamehameha Schools, Windward Community College, Kapiolani Community College, Kaiser High School, and Hahaione Elementary. The wahine from the Womans Community Correctional Facility continue to volunteer once a month. We produced 12 episodes of a monthly program on Olelo called Maunalua: Past. Present. Future. and worked to improve our social media program run by the Huis Youth Advisors.We commenced with a huge fundraiser for acquiring 181 acres of mauka land on the Ka Iwi Coast. We started the process to purchase this land in 2013 and in 2015 needed to raise an additional $500,000 to cap off the $3.5 million secured by our acquisition partner The Trust for Public Land. In the summer of 2015 we launched a grassroots fundraising effort that raised approximately $600,000 in three months. We also commenced with developing a Corridor Management Plan for our Maunalua Makapuu Scenic Byway program run by the state Division of Transportation. We hired Townscape to help facilitate the community planning process.
Program expenses $61,615.00$2,460.00 
Program revenue  $120.00 
Program description In 2015 restoration work continued on the land (5-acres) purchased in 2014 (Hawea heiau complex and Keawawa wetland off Hawaii Kai Drive) for the protection of cultural sites registered with the State Historic Preservation Division and the protection of Federally protected /endangered alaeula (Hawaiian moorhen). Keawawa wetland also provides habitat for indigenous aukuu (black-crowned night heron), endemic pinao (giant green darner dragonfly), various species of native damselflies, and endangered aeo (Hawaiian stilt) thus the monthly water- and land-based predator control program started in 2014 was continued with Greyboar Wildlife Services. Planning and implementation of Phases III and IV of our Natural Resources Conservation Service conservation plan was completed (upland removal of invasive shrubs and trees and the planting of native trees and plants). Additional removal of illegally-dumped post-construction debris, residential garbage and more aged tennis balls were removed during Phase III work (upland). Over 350 native seedlings (Maunalua specific and wetland oriented for low land) were planted with 15 native trees upland. National award winning coconut tree Coco lost her crown late 2014, so she was taken down and shared with local halau and wood carvers for creating drums for future cultural ceremony. We spent over $6,000 to care for coco trees, and installed additional fencing between the heiau and newly constructed residential building to the west of our property. Approximately $30,000 was budgeted and spent on grounds maintenance for the Huis wetland, heiau, and agricultural projects. We continued contract work with a cultural educator for Pahua heiau and Hawea heiau as well as continued to contract a natural resource educator to facilitate eco-cultural education and activities utilizing Keawawa wetland and Hawea and Pahua heiaus as outdoor learning laboratories including place-based volunteer programs for students and the community. In 2015 we continued our fiscal sponsorship of Aloha Aina O Kamilo Nui nursery, assisted with their community projects and commenced with a volunteer driven program to grow native plants for Maunalua-based community restoration projects. In addition, we worked with volunteers to implement pilot programs at the nursery which include: honey (three bee boxes), mamaki tea (an entire greenhouse dedicated to growing mamaki), planting uala (sweet potato) in a mini (demonstration)rotational crop plot). We also held several agricultural oriented workshops at the nursery. During the year, monthly Community Volunteer Days opened the land to the public, including tours of Hawea heiau. Other guided tours were arranged as requested by the community. Cultural practitioners conducted Equinox celebrations, drumming and hula. Businesses and youth and church groups conducted community service projects. Volunteers were instructed on restoration practices, and school groups were taught science-based curricula. Schools / students that participated were Honolulu Waldorf School, Kamehameha Schools, Windward Community College, Kapiolani Community College, Kaiser High School, and Hahaione Elementary. The wahine from the Womans Community Correctional Facility continue to volunteer once a month. We produced 12 episodes of a monthly program on Olelo called Maunalua: Past. Present. Future. and worked to improve our social media program run by the Huis Youth Advisors.We commenced with a huge fundraiser for acquiring 181 acres of mauka land on the Ka Iwi Coast. We started the process to purchase this land in 2013 and in 2015 needed to raise an additional $500,000 to cap off the $3.5 million secured by our acquisition partner The Trust for Public Land. In the summer of 2015 we launched a grassroots fundraising effort that raised approximately $600,000 in three months. We also commenced with developing a Corridor Management Plan for our Maunalua Makapuu Scenic Byway program run by the state Division of Transportation. We hired Townscape to help facilitate the community planning process.We entered into a contract with a cultural educator and a natural resource educator to facilitate eco-cultural education and activities utilizing Keawawa wetland and Hawea and Pahua heiaus as outdoor learning laboratories including place-based volunteer programs for students and the community. During the year Community Volunteer Days, including tours of Hawea heiau, were conducted monthly. Other guided tours were arranged as requested by the community. Cultural practitioners conducted Equinox celebrations, drumming and hula. Businesses and youth and church groups conducted community service projects. Volunteers were instructed on restoration practices, and school groups were taught science-based curricula. Schools that participated were Honolulu Waldorf School, Kamehameha Schools, Maryknoll, Windward Community College, Kaiser High School, and Hahaione Elementary. The wahine from the Womans Community Correctional Facility volunteered once a month. 
Land Purchase. During 2014 we purchased 5 acres of land located on Hawaii Kai Drive for the protection of Hawea heiau complex and restoration of Keawawa wetland. Keawawa wetland is a spring-fed estuarine wetland connected to the ocean via Kuapa Pond (Hawaii Kai Marina). Keawawa provides habitat for indigenous aukuu (black-crowned night heron), endemic pinao (giant green darner dragonfly), various species of native damselflies, endangered aeo (Hawaiian stilt), and 5 - 12 of the less than 400 remaining endangered alae ula (Hawaiian moorhen). There are numerous ancient rock structures and evidence of Hawea heiau complex on the property including: a luakini heiau platform, house sites, petroglyphs, ahu (altar), a spring-fed well and fishpond/wetland walls and terraces. The cost of the land was $650,000 and is included as an asset on our balance sheet.Planning and implementation of Phase I and II of conservation plan.Prior to the purchase of the Keawawa wetland, we were allowed to start cleaning up the land. We removed illegally-dumped post-construction debris, residential garbage and thousands of aged tennis balls on the 5 acres and over 330 invasive trees and shrubs on 3 acres. Chip and mulch were added on site. We invested approximately $22,700 in fencing to control pedestrian access.During 2014 we also implemented a water- and land-based predator control program to protect the nesting aleula and chicks.Approximately $50,000 was expended in 2012 2013 for land clearing and conservation work, of which $39,463 is included as land improvements on our balance sheet.
Program expenses  $46,083.00 
Program description  Land Purchase. During 2014 we purchased 5 acres of land located on Hawaii Kai Drive for the protection of Hawea heiau complex and restoration of Keawawa wetland. Keawawa wetland is a spring-fed estuarine wetland connected to the ocean via Kuapa Pond (Hawaii Kai Marina). Keawawa provides habitat for indigenous aukuu (black-crowned night heron), endemic pinao (giant green darner dragonfly), various species of native damselflies, endangered aeo (Hawaiian stilt), and 5 - 12 of the less than 400 remaining endangered alae ula (Hawaiian moorhen). There are numerous ancient rock structures and evidence of Hawea heiau complex on the property including: a luakini heiau platform, house sites, petroglyphs, ahu (altar), a spring-fed well and fishpond/wetland walls and terraces. The cost of the land was $650,000 and is included as an asset on our balance sheet.Planning and implementation of Phase I and II of conservation plan.Prior to the purchase of the Keawawa wetland, we were allowed to start cleaning up the land. We removed illegally-dumped post-construction debris, residential garbage and thousands of aged tennis balls on the 5 acres and over 330 invasive trees and shrubs on 3 acres. Chip and mulch were added on site. We invested approximately $22,700 in fencing to control pedestrian access.During 2014 we also implemented a water- and land-based predator control program to protect the nesting aleula and chicks.Approximately $50,000 was expended in 2012 2013 for land clearing and conservation work, of which $39,463 is included as land improvements on our balance sheet. 
Project 1: In 2016 Livable Hawaii Kai Hui took over operations at Aloha Aina O Kamilo Nui nursery (AAOK) to help the nursery farmer and neighboring farmers. AAOK is situated on just under 3-acres within the 87-agricultural acres of Kamilonui Valley (Hawaii Kai). The nursery is 45 years old with aged infrastructure. This once thriving typical plant nursery, under LHK Hui, is being converted to a nursery that focuses on sustainable practices with emphasis on growing Maunalua raised plants for community restoration projects. The nursery is volunteer driven and led by 5 core members of which two are LHKH board members. The previous years Mamaki project (native plant for tea) proved successful. Packaged Mamaki tea leaves and crushed, is a seasonal product of the nursery as is honey, herbs, orchids, anthuriums, palms, neem and rental of trees and shrubs for events. Native plants grown are not sold to the public but grown exclusively for Maunalua-based community restoration projects. In 2016, several workshops were held in the restored piko hale. Bananas, papaya and breadfruit are given away to residents, Lunalilo Home and volunteers.
Program expenses$59,859.00   
Program descriptionProject 1: In 2016 Livable Hawaii Kai Hui took over operations at Aloha Aina O Kamilo Nui nursery (AAOK) to help the nursery farmer and neighboring farmers. AAOK is situated on just under 3-acres within the 87-agricultural acres of Kamilonui Valley (Hawaii Kai). The nursery is 45 years old with aged infrastructure. This once thriving typical plant nursery, under LHK Hui, is being converted to a nursery that focuses on sustainable practices with emphasis on growing Maunalua raised plants for community restoration projects. The nursery is volunteer driven and led by 5 core members of which two are LHKH board members. The previous years Mamaki project (native plant for tea) proved successful. Packaged Mamaki tea leaves and crushed, is a seasonal product of the nursery as is honey, herbs, orchids, anthuriums, palms, neem and rental of trees and shrubs for events. Native plants grown are not sold to the public but grown exclusively for Maunalua-based community restoration projects. In 2016, several workshops were held in the restored piko hale. Bananas, papaya and breadfruit are given away to residents, Lunalilo Home and volunteers.   
Project 2: Restoration work continued on the land (5-acres) purchased in 2014 (Hawea heiau complex and Keawawa wetland off Hawaii Kai Drive) for the protection of cultural sites registered with the State Historic Preservation Division and the protection of Federally protected /endangered alaeula (Hawaiian moorhen). Keawawa wetland also provides habitat for indigenous aukuu (black-crowned night heron), endemic pinao (giant green darner dragonfly), various species of native damselflies, and endangered aeo (Hawaiian stilt) thus the monthly water and land-based predator control program started in 2014, was continued with Greyboar Wildlife Services. Except for planning and implementation of a specialty fence within the Oahu Club side of the wetland and upland trees, our Natural Resources Conservation Service conservation plan was completed and acknowledged via public NRCS signage. Out-plantings are marked, and temporary signs installed noting the plants by Hawaiian name. During the summer months all vegetation is hand watered. During the rainy season we focus on planting. New native seedlings (125) were planted in 2016. Ecology advisor Charles van Rees, a Ph. D. Candidate, Tufts University (Tufts Institute of Environment) guided us on a wetland enhancement pilot program plus banded additional alaeula at Keawawa. He also led a successful grant opportunity with Disney Conservation Fund between Tufts University, Livable Hawaii Kai Hui and Conservation Council for Hawaii. The coconut tree Coco who lost her crown late 2015, was gifted back to Livable Hawaii Kai Hui as a drum (made from the trunk of the tree) named Kanialaa at a ceremony led by cultural educator Kaleo Paik. Master wood carver Brad Cooper along with local hula halau and area kupuna and cultural practitioners arranged the cultural ceremony at the base of Hawea heiau complex. The public attended.
Program expenses$45,503.00   
Program descriptionProject 2: Restoration work continued on the land (5-acres) purchased in 2014 (Hawea heiau complex and Keawawa wetland off Hawaii Kai Drive) for the protection of cultural sites registered with the State Historic Preservation Division and the protection of Federally protected /endangered alaeula (Hawaiian moorhen). Keawawa wetland also provides habitat for indigenous aukuu (black-crowned night heron), endemic pinao (giant green darner dragonfly), various species of native damselflies, and endangered aeo (Hawaiian stilt) thus the monthly water and land-based predator control program started in 2014, was continued with Greyboar Wildlife Services. Except for planning and implementation of a specialty fence within the Oahu Club side of the wetland and upland trees, our Natural Resources Conservation Service conservation plan was completed and acknowledged via public NRCS signage. Out-plantings are marked, and temporary signs installed noting the plants by Hawaiian name. During the summer months all vegetation is hand watered. During the rainy season we focus on planting. New native seedlings (125) were planted in 2016. Ecology advisor Charles van Rees, a Ph. D. Candidate, Tufts University (Tufts Institute of Environment) guided us on a wetland enhancement pilot program plus banded additional alaeula at Keawawa. He also led a successful grant opportunity with Disney Conservation Fund between Tufts University, Livable Hawaii Kai Hui and Conservation Council for Hawaii. The coconut tree Coco who lost her crown late 2015, was gifted back to Livable Hawaii Kai Hui as a drum (made from the trunk of the tree) named Kanialaa at a ceremony led by cultural educator Kaleo Paik. Master wood carver Brad Cooper along with local hula halau and area kupuna and cultural practitioners arranged the cultural ceremony at the base of Hawea heiau complex. The public attended.   
Project 3 and other projects: We continued contract work with a cultural educator for Pahua heiau and Hawea heiau as well as continued to contract a natural resource educator to facilitate eco-cultural education and activities utilizing Keawawa wetland and Hawea and Pahua heiaus as outdoor learning laboratories including place-based volunteer programs for students and the community. Cultural educator Kaleo Paik successfully secured a small grant for LHKH, via Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce, to commence with development of a Maunalua docent program. During the year, monthly Community Volunteer Days opened the land to the public, including tours of Hawea heiau. Other guided tours were arranged as requested by the community. Cultural practitioners conducted Equinox celebrations, drumming and hula. Businesses and youth and church groups conducted community service projects. Volunteers were instructed on restoration practices, and school groups were taught science-based curricula. Together with Avalon Development (7000 Hawaii Kai Drive) we debuted a joint landscape plan for open park space on Hawaii Kai Drive and Keahole. The plan is targeted for installation by phase commencing late 2017 through 2019. The Womans Community Correctional Facility continue to volunteer once a month. We produced 12 episodes of a monthly program on Olelo called Maunalua: Past. Present. Future. and worked to improve our social media program run by the Huis Youth Advisors. We also launched www.kaiwicost.org website to share Ka Iwi news including updates on the Corridor Management Plan for the Maunalua Makapuu Scenic Byway being developed by community with the assistance of Townscape. The Maunalua Makapuu Scenic Byway is in partnership with the state Division of Transportation.
Program expenses$41,218.00   
Program revenue$14,513.00   
Program descriptionProject 3 and other projects: We continued contract work with a cultural educator for Pahua heiau and Hawea heiau as well as continued to contract a natural resource educator to facilitate eco-cultural education and activities utilizing Keawawa wetland and Hawea and Pahua heiaus as outdoor learning laboratories including place-based volunteer programs for students and the community. Cultural educator Kaleo Paik successfully secured a small grant for LHKH, via Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce, to commence with development of a Maunalua docent program. During the year, monthly Community Volunteer Days opened the land to the public, including tours of Hawea heiau. Other guided tours were arranged as requested by the community. Cultural practitioners conducted Equinox celebrations, drumming and hula. Businesses and youth and church groups conducted community service projects. Volunteers were instructed on restoration practices, and school groups were taught science-based curricula. Together with Avalon Development (7000 Hawaii Kai Drive) we debuted a joint landscape plan for open park space on Hawaii Kai Drive and Keahole. The plan is targeted for installation by phase commencing late 2017 through 2019. The Womans Community Correctional Facility continue to volunteer once a month. We produced 12 episodes of a monthly program on Olelo called Maunalua: Past. Present. Future. and worked to improve our social media program run by the Huis Youth Advisors. We also launched www.kaiwicost.org website to share Ka Iwi news including updates on the Corridor Management Plan for the Maunalua Makapuu Scenic Byway being developed by community with the assistance of Townscape. The Maunalua Makapuu Scenic Byway is in partnership with the state Division of Transportation.   
Financial data
Revenue
Total revenue$81,911.00$76,620.00$1,190,259.00$103,684.00
Revenue from contributions (total)$66,399.00$69,137.00$1,186,174.00$101,895.00
Revenue from noncash contributions$3,741.00$250.00$100.00 
Investment income, current yr$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Total revenue from grants, etc., current yr$66,399.00$69,137.00$1,186,174.00 
Total unrelated business revenue$500.00$0.00$0.00 
Other revenue, current yr$6,507.00$7,133.00$3,965.00 
Program service revenue (total)$9,005.00$350.00$120.00$0.00
Gross receipts$82,822.00$79,318.00$1,194,065.00 
Sources of contributions
Revenue from federated campaigns $111.00  
Contributions revenue from membership dues  $20.00 
Revenue from gov't grants$35,773.00$32,164.00$657,032.00 
Revenue from all other contributions$30,626.00$36,862.00$529,122.00 
Other types of revenue
Royalties (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Miscellaneous revenue (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Net revenue from gaming (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Income from dividends, interest, and similar investments$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Net rental income$500.00$0.00$0.00$0.00
Net income from fundraising events$1,290.00$6,210.00$3,336.00 
Net inventory sales (total)$4,717.00$923.00$629.00 
Expense categories (totals)
Total functional expenses: sum of all$162,245.00$91,227.00$54,642.00 
Total functional expenses: program service $146,580.00$61,615.00$48,543.00 
Total functional expenses: management and general$13,864.00$8,508.00$5,105.00 
Total functional expenses: fundraising$1,801.00$21,104.00$994.00 
Fees for services
Lobbying fees (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Legal fees (total)$2,500.00$0.00$0.00 
Fundraising service fees (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00 
General management fees (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Investment management fees (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Assets and liabilities
Total assets$1,235,873.00$1,206,207.00$1,220,814.00$79,600.00
Total assets, beginning of year$1,206,207.00$1,220,814.00$85,197.00$9,619.00
Total liabilities$110,000.00$0.00$0.00$3,000.00
Total liabilities, beginning of year   $3,000.00
Pledges & accounts receivable, net$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Loans & receivables from key persons$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Unrestricted net assets, end of yr$1,096,920.00$1,178,747.00$1,220,124.00 
Temporarily restricted net assets$28,953.00$27,460.00$690.00 
Net assets$1,125,873.00$1,206,207.00$1,220,814.00$79,600.00
Net assets, beginning of year$1,206,207.00$1,220,814.00$85,197.00 
Intangible assets$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Other assets$0.00$20,000.00$20,000.00 
Investments: other securities$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Investments: publicly traded securities$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Cash: non-interest bearing$363,651.00$446,713.00$492,572.00 
Cash: non-interest bearing, beginning of year$446,713.00$492,572.00$27,472.00 
Investments -- program-related$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Inventories for sale or use$47,872.00$10,000.00$0.00 
Other financial variables
Revenue less expenses-$80,334.00-$14,607.00$1,135,617.00 
Advertising (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Savings & temp cash investment$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Accounts receivable, net$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Prepaid expenses & deferred charges$74.00$0.00$0.00 
Unsecured notes & loans to unrelated parties$110,000.00   
Total net assets or fund balances$1,125,873.00$1,206,207.00$1,220,814.00 
Depreciation, depletion, amortization$21,241.00$2,777.00$2,204.00 
Payment to affiliates$0.00$0.00$0.00 
Governance and accountability
Number of voting members788 
Number of independent voting members788 
Cash accountingTrueTrueTrueTrue
Tax year start date2016-01-012015-01-012014-01-012012-01-01
Tax year end date2016-12-012015-12-012014-12-012012-12-01
Metadata about the filing
E-return type: 990, 990EZ, or 990PF990990990990EZ
Date e-filing submitted2018-01-092017-07-122016-03-262016-02-26
IRS schema version2016v3.02015v3.02014v6.02012v3.0
Filing identifier201743209349300829201710219349300611201600329349300100201533429349200023
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