Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Address
4000 JONES BRIDGE ROAD
CHEVY CHASE, MD 20815
Contact
Website: http://www.hhmi.org
Phone: +1 (301) 215-8500
Nonprofit
NTEE: H90 - Medical Specialty Research
EIN: 59-0735717

Mission

THE HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE ("INSTITUTE" OR "HHMI") IS THE NATION'S LARGEST PRIVATE BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTION, WITH JUST OVER $19 BILLION IN NET ASSETS AT THE END OF ITS 2017 FISCAL YEAR. THE MISSION OF THE INSTITUTE HAS REMAINED CONSTANT SINCE ITS FOUNDING IN 1953. AS ITS CHARTER STATES "THE PRIMARY PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVE OF THE HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE SHALL BE THE PROMOTION OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE WITHIN THE FIELD OF BASIC SCIENCES (PRINCIPALLY THE FIELD OF MEDICAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION) AND THE EFFECTIVE APPLICATION THEREOF FOR THE BENEFIT OF MANKIND."
 201720162015
Basic features of the organization
Year of formation1953
Subsection501(c)(3)
Organization typeCorporation
Metropolitan statistical area8872.0
Human resources, including compensation
Summary compensation info
Total compensation of current key personnel$10,536,023.00$15,274,181.00$16,232,263.00
Sum of reportable (W2/1099) compensation$18,274,988.00$20,066,117.00$17,973,219.00
Number of employees325533833496
Number of people compensated >$100k711722758
Number of volunteers000
Number of highly compensated contractors156158141
Personnel
Baker, James
TitleTRUSTEETRUSTEETRUSTEE
Name of key/compensated personJAMES A BAKER III ESQJAMES A BAKER III ESQJAMES A BAKER III ESQ
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.00
Reportable compensation from org$40,000.00$40,000.00$40,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Barnard, Mark
TitleMAN DIR - PRIVATE EQUITIES thru 6/16MAN DIR - PRIVATE EQUITIESMAN DIR - PRIVATE EQUITIES
Name of key/compensated personMARK A BARNARDMARK A BARNARDMARK A BARNARD
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$689,350.00$1,280,482.00$1,138,326.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$32,021.00$58,403.00$51,698.00
PositionKey employeeKey employeeKey employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Barshefsky, Charlene
TitleTRUSTEETRUSTEETRUSTEE
Name of key/compensated personCHARLENE BARSHEFSKY ESQCHARLENE BARSHEFSKY ESQCHARLENE BARSHEFSKY ESQ
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.00
Reportable compensation from org$40,000.00$40,000.00$40,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Carroll, Sean
TitleVP FOR SCIENCE EDUCATIONVP FOR SCIENCE EDUCATIONVP FOR SCIENCE EDUCATION
Name of key/compensated personSEAN B CARROLL PHDSEAN B CARROLL PHDSEAN B CARROLL PHD
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$702,062.00$690,554.00$672,231.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$52,549.00$53,014.00$50,093.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Cech, Thomas
TitleINVESTIGATORINVESTIGATORINVESTIGATOR
Name of key/compensated personTHOMAS R CECH PHDTHOMAS R CECH PHDTHOMAS R CECH PHD
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$655,133.00$629,730.00$619,050.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$47,933.00$52,258.00$46,274.00
PositionHighly compensated employeeHighly compensated employeeHighly compensated employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Clapham, David
TitleVP & CHIEF SCI OFF  
Name of key/compensated personDAVID CLAPHAM PHD  
Average hours per week working for org40.0  
Reportable compensation from org$506,885.00  
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$54,464.00  
PositionOfficer  
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00  
Deninno, Gregory
TitleMAN DIR - PRIVATE EQUITIESMAN DIR - PRIVATE EQUITIES 
Name of key/compensated personGREGORY DENINNOGREGORY DENINNO 
Average hours per week working for org40.040.0 
Reportable compensation from org$451,846.00$587,265.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$59,943.00$56,996.00 
PositionKey employeeKey employee 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00 
Goldstein, Joseph
TitleTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN RESEARCH COMMTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN RESEARCH COMMTRUSTEE
Name of key/compensated personJOSEPH L GOLDSTEIN MDJOSEPH L GOLDSTEIN MDJOSEPH L GOLDSTEIN MD
Average hours per week working for org4.04.02.00
Reportable compensation from org$48,000.00$56,000.00$44,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Henning, Heidi
TitleVP,GENERAL COUNSEL/SECVP,GENERAL COUNSEL/SECVP,GENERAL COUNSEL/SEC
Name of key/compensated personHEIDI E HENNING ESQHEIDI E HENNING ESQHEIDI E HENNING ESQ
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$588,945.00$565,186.00$560,095.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$56,526.00$54,742.00$51,453.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Jibrell, Mohamoud
Title VP FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGYVP FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Name of key/compensated person MOHAMOUD JIBRELLMOHAMOUD JIBRELL
Average hours per week working for org 40.040.00
Reportable compensation from org $320,220.00$326,866.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs $158,629.00$54,835.00
Position Former employeeOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs  $0.00$0.00
Kandel, Eric
TitleSENIOR INVESTIGATORSENIOR INVESTIGATORSENIOR INVESTIGATOR
Name of key/compensated personERIC R KANDEL MDERIC R KANDEL MDERIC R KANDEL MD
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$615,568.00$596,905.00$587,178.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$59,965.00$58,434.00$51,602.00
PositionHighly compensated employeeHighly compensated employeeHighly compensated employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Keith, Garnett
Title TRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMM until 2/16TRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMM
Name of key/compensated person GARNETT L KEITHGARNETT L KEITH
Average hours per week working for org 4.04.00
Reportable compensation from org $50,000.00$50,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs $0.00$0.00
Position Individual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs  $0.00$0.00
Kitsoulis, Stephen
TitleMAN DIR - FIXED INCOMEMAN DIR - FIXED INCOMEMAN DIR - FIXED INCOME
Name of key/compensated personSTEPHEN M KITSOULISSTEPHEN M KITSOULISSTEPHEN M KITSOULIS
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$784,355.00$903,019.00$858,973.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$46,813.00$47,198.00$45,297.00
PositionKey employeeKey employeeKey employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Koch, Donald
TitleMAN DIR - PORTFOLIO STRATEGYMAN DIR - PORTFOLIO STRATEGY 
Name of key/compensated personDONALD KOCHDONALD KOCH 
Average hours per week working for org40.040.0 
Reportable compensation from org$1,052,044.00$978,620.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$54,365.00$58,524.00 
PositionHighly compensated employeeHighly compensated employee 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00 
Kolyer, Robert
TitleMAN DIR - DIVERSIFIED ASSETSMAN DIR - DIVERSIFIED ASSETSMAN DIR - DIVERSIFIED ASSETS
Name of key/compensated personROBERT J KOLYER JRROBERT J KOLYER JRROBERT J KOLYER JR
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$1,379,765.00$1,459,392.00$1,290,140.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$53,381.00$54,773.00$52,499.00
PositionKey employeeKey employeeKey employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Kotak, Nitin
TitleCFO & TREASURER thru 6/17VP, CFO & TREASURERVP, CFO & TREASURER
Name of key/compensated personNITIN V KOTAKNITIN V KOTAKNITIN V KOTAK
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$411,844.00$406,965.00$406,101.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$52,709.00$57,153.00$52,876.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Lummis, Fred
TitleTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMM starting 2/16TRUSTEE
Name of key/compensated personFRED R LUMMISFRED R LUMMISFRED R LUMMIS
Average hours per week working for org4.04.02.00
Reportable compensation from org$50,000.00$40,000.00$40,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Madhok, Anil
TitleMAN DIR - INVESTMENTS & COOMAN DIR - INVESTMENTS & COOMAN DIR - INVESTMENTS & COO
Name of key/compensated personANIL MADHOKANIL MADHOKANIL MADHOK
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$958,364.00$1,118,843.00$968,600.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$41,739.00$41,031.00$49,627.00
PositionHighly compensated employeeHighly compensated employeeHighly compensated employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Marcus, Monique
TitleCONTROLLERCONTROLLERASSISTANT CONTROLLER
Name of key/compensated personMONIQUE L MARCUSMONIQUE L MARCUSMONIQUE L MARCUS
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$197,419.00$183,211.00$184,608.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$47,863.00$45,647.00$42,294.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Matney, Ryan
Title DIRECTOR-DIVERSIFIED ASSETSDIRECTOR-DIVERSIFIED ASSETS
Name of key/compensated person RYAN L MATNEYRYAN L MATNEY
Average hours per week working for org 40.040.00
Reportable compensation from org $603,568.00$600,500.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs $56,286.00$54,739.00
Position Highly compensated employeeHighly compensated employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs  $0.00$0.00
McKearin, Dennis
TitleVP OF OPERATIONS ACTING DIRECTOR K-RITH & SENIOR SCIENCE OFFICER
Name of key/compensated personDENNIS MCKEARIN PHD DENNIS MCKEARIN
Average hours per week working for org40.0 40.00
Reportable compensation from org$618,252.00 $590,303.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$98,759.00 $128,911.00
PositionOfficer Highly compensated employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00 $0.00
Moore, Cheryl
TitleEXECUTIVE VP & COO thru 1/16EXECUTIVE VP & COOEXECUTIVE VP & COO
Name of key/compensated personCHERYL A MOORECHERYL A MOORECHERYL A MOORE
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$129,023.00$891,077.00$873,305.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$3,659.00$47,771.00$43,522.00
PositionFormer employeeOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Mph, Susan
Title  TRUSTEE
Name of key/compensated person  SUSAN DESMOND-HELLMANN MD MPH
Average hours per week working for org  2.00
Reportable compensation from org  $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs  $0.00
Position  Individual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs   $0.00
Nurse, Paul
TitleTRUSTEETRUSTEETRUSTEE
Name of key/compensated personPAUL M NURSE PHDPAUL M NURSE PHDPAUL M NURSE PHD
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.00
Reportable compensation from org$40,000.00$46,000.00$40,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
O'Shea, Erin
TitlePRESIDENTVP & CHIEF SCI OFFVP & CHIEF SCI OFF
Name of key/compensated personERIN K O'SHEA PHDERIN K O'SHEA PHDERIN K O'SHEA PHD
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$831,324.00$753,361.00$729,474.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$45,716.00$45,598.00$43,306.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Palmisano, John
TitleVP FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY thru 8/16VP FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY effective 11/15 
Name of key/compensated personJOHN PALMISANOJOHN PALMISANO 
Average hours per week working for org40.040.0 
Reportable compensation from org$286,424.00$31,622.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$35,335.00$3,283.00 
PositionFormer employeeOfficer 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00 
Pender, Richard
TitleMAN DIR - US EQUITIESMAN DIR - US EQUITIESMAN DIR - US EQUITIES
Name of key/compensated personRICHARD A PENDERRICHARD A PENDERRICHARD A PENDER
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$1,024,984.00$976,092.00$1,222,924.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$53,643.00$53,710.00$51,042.00
PositionKey employeeKey employeeKey employee
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Plotnick, Susan
TitleASSISTANT TREASURER & DIRECTOR-FINANCEASSISTANT TREASURER & DIRECTOR-FINANCEASSISTANT TREASURER & DIRECTOR-FINANCE
Name of key/compensated personSUSAN S PLOTNICKSUSAN S PLOTNICKSUSAN S PLOTNICK
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$242,544.00$235,740.00$236,242.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$56,211.00$55,201.00$48,624.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Richard, Alison
TitleTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN EDUCATION COMMTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN EDUCATION COMMTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN ED&INTL COMM
Name of key/compensated personALISON F RICHARD PHDALISON F RICHARD PHDALISON F RICHARD PHD
Average hours per week working for org4.02.02.00
Reportable compensation from org$50,000.00$50,000.00$50,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Rose, Clayton
TitleTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN AUDIT & COMPTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN AUDIT & COMPTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN AUDIT & COMP
Name of key/compensated personCLAYTON S ROSE PHDCLAYTON S ROSE PHDCLAYTON S ROSE PHD
Average hours per week working for org6.06.06.00
Reportable compensation from org$50,000.00$50,000.00$50,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Rubin, Gerald
TitleVP&EXEC DIR,JANELIA RES CAMPUSVP&EXEC DIR,JANELIA RES CAMPUSVP&EXEC DIR,JANELIA RES CAMPUS
Name of key/compensated personGERALD M RUBIN PHDGERALD M RUBIN PHDGERALD M RUBIN PHD
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$773,105.00$744,485.00$729,956.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$114,626.00$123,162.00$115,740.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Schmoke, Kurt
TitleTRUSTEE, CHAIRMANTRUSTEE, CHAIRMANTRUSTEE, CHAIRMAN
Name of key/compensated personKURT L SCHMOKE ESQKURT L SCHMOKE ESQKURT L SCHMOKE ESQ
Average hours per week working for org6.06.06.00
Reportable compensation from org$60,000.00$60,000.00$60,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Spar, Deborah
TitleTRUSTEETRUSTEE 
Name of key/compensated personDEBORAH L SPAR PHDDEBORAH L SPAR PHD 
Average hours per week working for org2.02.0 
Reportable compensation from org$33,911.00$0.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00 
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00 
Spiliotes, Lauren
TitleDEP GENCOUNSEL/ASST SECDEP GENCOUNSEL/ASST SECDEP GENCOUNSEL/ASST SEC
Name of key/compensated personLAUREN T SPILIOTES ESQLAUREN T SPILIOTES ESQLAUREN T SPILIOTES ESQ
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$403,384.00$382,251.00$380,845.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$55,496.00$49,552.00$52,800.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Tatlock, Anne
TitleTRUSTEETRUSTEETRUSTEE
Name of key/compensated personANNE M TATLOCKANNE M TATLOCKANNE M TATLOCK
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.00
Reportable compensation from org$40,000.00$40,000.00$40,000.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Tjian, Robert
TitlePRESIDENT thru 8/16PRESIDENTPRESIDENT
Name of key/compensated personROBERT TJIAN PHDROBERT TJIAN PHDROBERT TJIAN PHD
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$1,294,848.00$1,364,377.00$1,349,898.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$61,563.00$72,244.00$52,230.00
PositionHighly compensated employeeOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Wyszynski, Kathy
TitleVP, HUMAN RESOURCES thru 8/16VP, HUMAN RESOURCESVP, HUMAN RESOURCES
Name of key/compensated personKATHY WYSZYNSKIKATHY WYSZYNSKIKATHY WYSZYNSKI
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$282,175.00$279,928.00$274,563.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$40,923.00$40,532.00$35,404.00
PositionFormer employeeOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Zimmerman, Landis
TitleVP & CHIEF INVESTMENT OFFICERVP & CHIEF INVESTMENT OFFICERVP & CHIEF INVESTMENT OFFICER
Name of key/compensated personLANDIS ZIMMERMANLANDIS ZIMMERMANLANDIS ZIMMERMAN
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.00
Reportable compensation from org$2,943,434.00$3,611,224.00$2,919,041.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$56,307.00$56,631.00$53,771.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Purpose: mission, activities & accomplishments
Mission or significant activitiesTHE HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE IS A PHILANTHROPY THAT SERVES SOCIETY THROUGH THE DIRECT CONDUCT OF BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND SUPPORT FOR PROGRAMS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION.THE HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE IS A PHILANTHROPY THAT SERVES SOCIETY THROUGH THE DIRECT CONDUCT OF BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND SUPPORT FOR PROGRAMS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION.THE HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE IS A PHILANTHROPY THAT SERVES SOCIETY THROUGH THE DIRECT CONDUCT OF BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND SUPPORT FOR PROGRAMS IN SCIENCE EDUCATION.
Program expenses (total)$783,268,249.00$879,899,696.00$786,192,206.00
Programs, including revenue & expenses
MEDICAL RESEARCH ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES (A) THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM (B) JANELIA RESEARCH CAMPUS (C) HIGHLIGHTS FROM HHMI RESEARCH LABORATORIES (FISCAL YEAR 2017) (D) HONORS AND AWARDS RECEIVED BY HHMI SCIENTISTS (A) THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM The Howard Hughes Medical Institute's approach to biomedical research can be summarized in three words: people, not projects. By employing scientists as HHMI investigators - rather than awarding research grants - the Institute provides long-term, flexible funding that enables its researchers to pursue their scientific interests wherever they lead. HHMI believes that scientists of exceptional talent and imagination will make fundamental discoveries of lasting scientific value and benefit to humanity if they are given the resources, time, and freedom to pursue challenging questions. The Institute nurtures the creativity and intellectual daring of scientists who are willing to set aside conventional wisdom or the "easy" question for a fundamental problem that may take many years to solve. Among the characteristics that distinguish this group of scientists are qualities such as creativity, a penchant for risk-taking, and a commitment to discovery, productivity, and perseverance. This unique research model is an imaginative and powerful alternative to funding biomedical research through grants. The HHMI Investigator Program employs more than 290 HHMI researchers, among them 15 Nobel laureates and 164 members of the National Academy of Sciences. HHMI investigators direct Institute research laboratories on the campuses of 63 universities and other research organizations throughout the United States. Since the early 1990s, investigators have been selected through rigorous national competitions. The Institute solicits applications directly from scientists at medical schools and other research institutions in the United States, with the aim of identifying those who have the potential to make significant contributions to science. HHMI employs an open application process to ensure that it is selecting its researchers from a broad and deep pool of scientific talent. In March 2017, HHMI announced that it would seek to appoint up to 20 new biomedical researchers through a national open competition. HHMI recently increased the standard term for HHMI investigators from five to seven years, providing longer term, flexible support as these scientists explore new research territory. The addition of 20 new investigators to this initiative represents a new investment of approximately $168 million in basic biomedical research over the next seven years. Finalists will be announced in Spring 2018, with appointments starting as early as September 1, 2018. Highlights of research conducted, and awards received, by HHMI scientists during its year ended August 31, 2017 are included below. (B) Janelia Research Campus The Janelia Research Campus offers a collaborative research environment for scientists across an array of disciplines who have focused on two broad scientific areas of scientific inquiry: the identification of general principles governing how neuronal circuits process information and development of imaging technologies and computational methods that support image analysis. In the current fiscal year, there were 42 group leaders, eight fellows and 15 senior fellows at Janelia, in addition to graduate students, other scientific trainees, and visiting scientists. Janelia also operates a vibrant scientific conference program, bringing many scientists to its campus each year for educational meetings.
Program expenses$659,754,981.00$711,129,790.00$717,815,985.00
Grants and allocations made $0.00 
Program revenue$2,552,736.00$2,169,244.00$2,033,219.00
Program descriptionMEDICAL RESEARCH ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES (A) THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM (B) JANELIA RESEARCH CAMPUS (C) HIGHLIGHTS FROM HHMI RESEARCH LABORATORIES (FISCAL YEAR 2017) (D) HONORS AND AWARDS RECEIVED BY HHMI SCIENTISTS (A) THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM The Howard Hughes Medical Institute's approach to biomedical research can be summarized in three words: people, not projects. By employing scientists as HHMI investigators - rather than awarding research grants - the Institute provides long-term, flexible funding that enables its researchers to pursue their scientific interests wherever they lead. HHMI believes that scientists of exceptional talent and imagination will make fundamental discoveries of lasting scientific value and benefit to humanity if they are given the resources, time, and freedom to pursue challenging questions. The Institute nurtures the creativity and intellectual daring of scientists who are willing to set aside conventional wisdom or the "easy" question for a fundamental problem that may take many years to solve. Among the characteristics that distinguish this group of scientists are qualities such as creativity, a penchant for risk-taking, and a commitment to discovery, productivity, and perseverance. This unique research model is an imaginative and powerful alternative to funding biomedical research through grants. The HHMI Investigator Program employs more than 290 HHMI researchers, among them 15 Nobel laureates and 164 members of the National Academy of Sciences. HHMI investigators direct Institute research laboratories on the campuses of 63 universities and other research organizations throughout the United States. Since the early 1990s, investigators have been selected through rigorous national competitions. The Institute solicits applications directly from scientists at medical schools and other research institutions in the United States, with the aim of identifying those who have the potential to make significant contributions to science. HHMI employs an open application process to ensure that it is selecting its researchers from a broad and deep pool of scientific talent. In March 2017, HHMI announced that it would seek to appoint up to 20 new biomedical researchers through a national open competition. HHMI recently increased the standard term for HHMI investigators from five to seven years, providing longer term, flexible support as these scientists explore new research territory. The addition of 20 new investigators to this initiative represents a new investment of approximately $168 million in basic biomedical research over the next seven years. Finalists will be announced in Spring 2018, with appointments starting as early as September 1, 2018. Highlights of research conducted, and awards received, by HHMI scientists during its year ended August 31, 2017 are included below. (B) Janelia Research Campus The Janelia Research Campus offers a collaborative research environment for scientists across an array of disciplines who have focused on two broad scientific areas of scientific inquiry: the identification of general principles governing how neuronal circuits process information and development of imaging technologies and computational methods that support image analysis. In the current fiscal year, there were 42 group leaders, eight fellows and 15 senior fellows at Janelia, in addition to graduate students, other scientific trainees, and visiting scientists. Janelia also operates a vibrant scientific conference program, bringing many scientists to its campus each year for educational meetings.MEDICAL RESEARCH ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES (A) THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM (B) JANELIA RESEARCH CAMPUS (C) HIGHLIGHTS FROM HHMI RESEARCH LABORATORIES (FISCAL YEAR 2016) (D) HONORS AND AWARDS RECEIVED BY HHMI SCIENTISTS (A) THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM THE HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE'S APPROACH TO BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CAN BE SUMMARIZED IN THREE WORDS: PEOPLE, NOT PROJECTS. BY EMPLOYING SCIENTISTS AS HHMI INVESTIGATORS - RATHER THAN AWARDING RESEARCH GRANTS - THE INSTITUTE PROVIDES LONG-TERM, FLEXIBLE FUNDING THAT ENABLES ITS RESEARCHERS TO PURSUE THEIR SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS WHEREVER THEY LEAD. HHMI BELIEVES THAT SCIENTISTS OF EXCEPTIONAL TALENT AND IMAGINATION WILL MAKE FUNDAMENTAL DISCOVERIES OF LASTING SCIENTIFIC VALUE AND BENEFIT TO HUMANITY IF THEY ARE GIVEN THE RESOURCES, TIME, AND FREEDOM TO PURSUE CHALLENGING QUESTIONS. THE INSTITUTE NURTURES THE CREATIVITY AND INTELLECTUAL DARING OF SCIENTISTS WHO ARE WILLING TO SET ASIDE CONVENTIONAL WISDOM OR THE "EASY" QUESTION FOR A FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEM THAT MAY TAKE MANY YEARS TO SOLVE. AMONG THE CHARACTERISTICS THAT DISTINGUISH THIS GROUP OF SCIENTISTS ARE QUALITIES SUCH AS CREATIVITY, A PENCHANT FOR RISK-TAKING, AND A COMMITMENT TO DISCOVERY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND PERSEVERANCE. THIS UNIQUE RESEARCH MODEL IS AN IMAGINATIVE AND POWERFUL ALTERNATIVE TO FUNDING BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH THROUGH GRANTS. THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM EMPLOYS MORE THAN 300 HHMI INVESTIGATORS, AMONG THEM 17 NOBEL LAUREATES AND 192 MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. HHMI INVESTIGATORS DIRECT INSTITUTE RESEARCH LABORATORIES ON THE CAMPUSES OF 65 UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. SINCE THE EARLY 1990S, INVESTIGATORS HAVE BEEN SELECTED THROUGH RIGOROUS NATIONAL COMPETITIONS. THE INSTITUTE SOLICITS APPLICATIONS DIRECTLY FROM SCIENTISTS AT MEDICAL SCHOOLS AND OTHER RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS IN THE UNITED STATES, WITH THE AIM OF IDENTIFYING THOSE WHO HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO MAKE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO SCIENCE. HHMI EMPLOYS AN OPEN APPLICATION PROCESS TO ENSURE THAT IT IS SELECTING ITS RESEARCHERS FROM A BROAD AND DEEP POOL OF SCIENTIFIC TALENT. In October 2015, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences selected Paul Modrich, an HHMI investigator at Duke University, together with Tomas Lindahl of the Francis Crick Institute and Clare Hall Laboratory in the UK and Aziz Sancar of University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, as recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for mechanistic studies of DNA repair. The trio was honored for mapping, at a molecular level, how cells repair damaged DNA and safeguard the genetic information. According to the Nobel Foundation, their work has provided fundamental knowledge of how a living cell functions and is, for instance, used for the development of new cancer treatments. In June 2016, the HHMI Trustees elected David E. Clapham, MD, PhD, an HHMI investigator at Boston Children's Hospital, as Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer. Clapham was the Aldo R. Castaneda Professor of Cardiovascular Research at Children's Hospital Boston and Professor of Neurobiology and Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. A member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he is a leader in the field of ion channel research. His research focuses on the role of calcium as an intracellular messenger and on the signals that control ion channels that carry calcium between cells. The identification and characterization of ion channels may make it possible to develop drugs that alleviate many disorders. Clapham succeeds Erin O'Shea, PhD, who was named president of HHMI . In HHMI launched the Transformative Technology Program that allows HHMI Investigators to acquire cutting-edge research equipment for their institution that simultaneously benefits their HHMI and non-HHMI colleagues. Through cost sharing with host institutions, the Transformative Technology Program provides a path by which HHMI scientists and colleagues can obtain research equipment that's typically difficult to fund. In general, this program will purchase and own the major equipment items, while the host institution's cost-sharing funds will support the ongoing setup and operation of the core facilities that house the instruments. In this initial competition, HHMI invested a total of $18.8 million for six projects that will benefit researchers around the country. This year, HHMI, the Simons Foundation, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation selected 84 Faculty Scholars, early-career scientists who have great potential to make unique contributions to their field. The scientists represent 43 institutions across the United States. Through the new Faculty Scholars Program, the philanthropies will spend about $83 million over five years to support the first cohort of scientists selected to receive grants. The range of five-year grant award totals is $600,000-$1.8 million, including indirect costs. Faculty Scholars are required to devote at least 50 percent of their total effort to the direct conduct of research. Highlights of research conducted, and awards received, by HHMI scientists during its year ended August 31, 2016 are included below. (B) Janelia Research Campus The Janelia Research Campus offers a collaborative research environment for scientists across an array of disciplines who have focused on two broad scientific areas of scientific inquiry: the identification of general principles governing how neuronal circuits process information and development of imaging technologies and computational methods that support image analysis. In the current fiscal year, there were 47 group leaders at Janelia, in addition to graduate students, other scientific trainees, and visiting scientists. Janelia also operates a vibrant scientific conference program, bringing many scientists to its campus each year for educational meetings . In 2016, Janelia expanded its research program by launching a Neuronal Cell Biology Program that will support scientists investigating the structural and functional details of discrete neurons and exploring the inner landscape of these cells in dynamic neural environments, and leverage existing research and tools created at Janelia, such as the lattice light sheet microscope. The program will be led by Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz, who moved to Janelia after 23 years as chief of the section on organelle biology in the Cell Biology and Metabolism Program, in the Division of Intramural Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).MEDICAL RESEARCH ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES (A) THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM (B) JANELIA RESEARCH CAMPUS (C) HIGHLIGHTS FROM HHMI RESEARCH LABORATORIES (FISCAL YEAR 2015) (D) HONORS AND AWARDS RECEIVED BY HHMI SCIENTISTS (A) THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM THE HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL INSTITUTE'S APPROACH TO BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH CAN BE SUMMARIZED IN THREE WORDS: PEOPLE, NOT PROJECTS. BY EMPLOYING SCIENTISTS AS HHMI INVESTIGATORS - RATHER THAN AWARDING RESEARCH GRANTS - THE INSTITUTE PROVIDES LONG-TERM, FLEXIBLE FUNDING THAT ENABLES ITS RESEARCHERS TO PURSUE THEIR SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS WHEREVER THEY LEAD. HHMI BELIEVES THAT SCIENTISTS OF EXCEPTIONAL TALENT AND IMAGINATION WILL MAKE FUNDAMENTAL DISCOVERIES OF LASTING SCIENTIFIC VALUE AND BENEFIT TO HUMANITY IF THEY ARE GIVEN THE RESOURCES, TIME, AND FREEDOM TO PURSUE CHALLENGING QUESTIONS. THE INSTITUTE NURTURES THE CREATIVITY AND INTELLECTUAL DARING OF SCIENTISTS WHO ARE WILLING TO SET ASIDE CONVENTIONAL WISDOM OR THE "EASY" QUESTION FOR A FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEM THAT MAY TAKE MANY YEARS TO SOLVE. AMONG THE CHARACTERISTICS THAT DISTINGUISH THIS GROUP OF SCIENTISTS ARE QUALITIES SUCH AS CREATIVITY, A PENCHANT FOR RISK-TAKING, AND A COMMITMENT TO DISCOVERY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND PERSEVERANCE. THIS UNIQUE RESEARCH MODEL IS AN IMAGINATIVE AND POWERFUL ALTERNATIVE TO FUNDING BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH THROUGH GRANTS. THE HHMI INVESTIGATOR PROGRAM EMPLOYS MORE THAN 300 HHMI INVESTIGATORS, AMONG THEM 17 NOBEL LAUREATES AND 182 MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. HHMI INVESTIGATORS DIRECT INSTITUTE RESEARCH LABORATORIES ON THE CAMPUSES OF 69 UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER RESEARCH ORGANIZATIONS THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. SINCE THE EARLY 1990S, INVESTIGATORS HAVE BEEN SELECTED THROUGH RIGOROUS NATIONAL COMPETITIONS. THE INSTITUTE SOLICITS APPLICATIONS DIRECTLY FROM SCIENTISTS AT MEDICAL SCHOOLS AND OTHER RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS IN THE UNITED STATES, WITH THE AIM OF IDENTIFYING THOSE WHO HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO MAKE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO SCIENCE. HHMI EMPLOYS AN OPEN APPLICATION PROCESS TO ENSURE THAT IT IS SELECTING ITS RESEARCHERS FROM A BROAD AND DEEP POOL OF SCIENTIFIC TALENT. In 2015, HHMI announced the selection of 26 new biomedical researchers as HHMI investigators, representing an investment of $153 million in basic biomedical research over the next five years. The scientists represent 19 institutions from across the United States. The new HHMI investigators - which include three current HHMI early career scientists - were selected for their individual scientific excellence from a group of 894 eligible applicants. The HHMI investigator competition was open to basic researchers and physician scientists at more than 200 eligible institutions who study significant biological problems in all of the biomedical disciplines, including plant biology, as well as in adjacent fields such as evolutionary biology, biophysics, chemical biology, biomedical engineering, and computational biology. Those selected in this competition receive a five-year appointment to HHMI, which is renewable pending favorable scientific review. Once selected, HHMI investigators continue to be based at their home institutions, typically leading a research group of 10-25 students, postdoctoral associates and technicians, but they become Institute employees and are supported by HHMI field staff. With freedom and flexibility come high expectations for intellectual output. HHMI demands creativity and innovation. Investigators are expected to work at the frontiers of their chosen field, to ask fundamental questions, and to take risks. HHMI prizes impact over publication volume in its merit-based renewal of investigator appointments and recognizes that some areas of research will proceed more slowly than others. The renewal of an investigator's five-year appointment is dependent on a rigorous peer-review process that centers on an evaluation of the originality and creativity of the investigator's work relative to others in the field, as well as the investigator's plan for future research. Those investigators whose appointments are not renewed remain HHMI employees for multi-year phase-out periods to facilitate their ability to obtain other funding for their research. HIGHLIGHTS OF RESEARCH CONDUCTED, AND AWARDS RECEIVED, BY HHMI SCIENTISTS DURING ITS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2015 ARE INCLUDED BELOW. (B) JANELIA RESEARCH CAMPUS THE JANELIA RESEARCH CAMPUS OFFERS A COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT FOR SCIENTISTS ACROSS AN ARRAY OF DISCIPLINES WHO HAVE FOCUSED ON TWO BROAD SCIENTIFIC AREAS OF SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: THE IDENTIFICATION OF GENERAL PRINCIPLES GOVERNING HOW NEURONAL CIRCUITS PROCESS INFORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGING TECHNOLOGIES AND COMPUTATIONAL METHODS THAT SUPPORT IMAGE ANALYSIS. IN THE CURRENT FISCAL YEAR, THERE WERE 43 GROUP LEADERS AT JANELIA, IN ADDITION TO MANY STAFF SCIENTISTS, OTHER SCIENTIFIC TRAINEES AND VISITING SCIENTISTS. Janelia also operates a vibrant scientific conference program, bringing many scientists to its campus each year for educational meetings. In October 2014, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced that Eric Betzig, a group leader at HHMI's Janelia Research Campus, Stefan Hell of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, and William Moerner of Stanford University were the recipients of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. For many years, optical microscopy had been held back by a presumed limitation: that it would never obtain a better resolution than half the wavelength of light. Helped by fluorescent molecules, the Nobel Laureates in Chemistry 2014 ingeniously circumvented this limitation. Their groundbreaking work has brought optical microscopy into the nanodimension.
SCIENCE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH GRANT PROGRAMS (A) GRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION AND MEDICAL RESEARCH TRAINING (B) PRECOLLEGE AND UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM (C) EDUCATIONAL MEDIA (D) TANGLED BANK STUDIOS (E) HANNA GRAY FELLOWS (F) FACULTY SCHOLARS (G) E-LIFE OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL HHMI'S DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION EMPHASIZES INITIATIVES WITH THE POWER TO TRANSFORM GRADUATE, UNDERGRADUATE, AND PRECOLLEGE EDUCATION IN THE LIFE SCIENCES. HHMI IS THE LARGEST PRIVATE FUNDER OF SCIENCE EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. DURING THE FISCAL YEAR, THE INSTITUTE DISTRIBUTED $38 MILLION IN GRANTS TO SUPPORT SCIENCE EDUCATION. The Institute's science education programs support ties between scientific research and teaching with the goal of increasing and enhancing student research opportunities; improving science courses, curricula, and instruction; and providing enhanced graduate and medical training opportunities. Most HHMI grants are awarded through competitions with specific objectives and eligibility criteria and awards are made following a stringent process of peer review. HHMI's educational activities are funded through three major programs; the goals of each program and the major activities for the year are summarized below. (A) Undergraduate Science Education Program These programs recruit and develop the future leaders of science and enhance science literacy among all students. Precollege grants support teacher training and inquiry-based student learning. Grants to colleges and universities support undergraduate student research, faculty and curriculum development, and science education outreach activities. In June, 2017, HHMI announced the first 24 schools selected in its Inclusive Excellence initiative. The initiative's broad objective is to help colleges and universities to increase their capacity for inclusion in science of all students, especially those students who come to college via non-traditional pathways. These "new majority" students include underrepresented ethnic minorities, first-generation college students, students who transfer from community colleges, and working adults with families. Inclusive Excellence is not simply making sure everyone can participate; rather, it means that the institution makes it clear that the students are welcome and are expected to succeed. HHMI continued its partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Pennsylvania State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), in the collaborative Meyerhoff Adaptation Project. The project aims to learn whether elements of UMBC's highly regarded Meyerhoff Scholars Program can be adapted at Penn State and UNC. The participating schools hope to share what they learn so other institutions might follow. During the five-year Meyerhoff Adaptation Project, Penn State and UNC, working closely with UMBC and HHMI, will expand and study the Meyerhoff model, while applying it to newly created programs on their campuses. The HHMI Professors Program empowers accomplished science faculty at leading research universities to apply the rigor and creativity that make them successful in research to important challenges in undergraduate science education. The professors model fundamental reform in the way undergraduate science is taught at research universities through innovative teaching and are encouraged to share ideas and collaborate with their peers to improve science education. Fifty-five scientists have been named HHMI professors since the program began in 2002. In addition to their commitment to student learning, these highly visible scientists have developed new educational resources and implemented novel mentoring programs to support students. In FY2018, HHMI will make awards to a new cohort of HHMI professors. The HHMI's Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP) is designed to encourage talented students to pursue careers in science by placing selected undergraduates in summer research experiences in the labs of HHMI investigators, professors, and at the Janelia Research Campus. In 2017, a total of 85 college students (63 first-year students and 22 second-year, "EXROP Capstone" students) were selected to participate in EXROP. The 2017 cohort marked the 15th year of the program.
Program expenses$87,600,256.00$147,854,974.00 
Grants and allocations made$59,883,743.00$117,992,048.00 
Program revenue$40,506.00$53,918.00 
Program descriptionSCIENCE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH GRANT PROGRAMS (A) GRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION AND MEDICAL RESEARCH TRAINING (B) PRECOLLEGE AND UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM (C) EDUCATIONAL MEDIA (D) TANGLED BANK STUDIOS (E) HANNA GRAY FELLOWS (F) FACULTY SCHOLARS (G) E-LIFE OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL HHMI'S DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION EMPHASIZES INITIATIVES WITH THE POWER TO TRANSFORM GRADUATE, UNDERGRADUATE, AND PRECOLLEGE EDUCATION IN THE LIFE SCIENCES. HHMI IS THE LARGEST PRIVATE FUNDER OF SCIENCE EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. DURING THE FISCAL YEAR, THE INSTITUTE DISTRIBUTED $38 MILLION IN GRANTS TO SUPPORT SCIENCE EDUCATION. The Institute's science education programs support ties between scientific research and teaching with the goal of increasing and enhancing student research opportunities; improving science courses, curricula, and instruction; and providing enhanced graduate and medical training opportunities. Most HHMI grants are awarded through competitions with specific objectives and eligibility criteria and awards are made following a stringent process of peer review. HHMI's educational activities are funded through three major programs; the goals of each program and the major activities for the year are summarized below. (A) Undergraduate Science Education Program These programs recruit and develop the future leaders of science and enhance science literacy among all students. Precollege grants support teacher training and inquiry-based student learning. Grants to colleges and universities support undergraduate student research, faculty and curriculum development, and science education outreach activities. In June, 2017, HHMI announced the first 24 schools selected in its Inclusive Excellence initiative. The initiative's broad objective is to help colleges and universities to increase their capacity for inclusion in science of all students, especially those students who come to college via non-traditional pathways. These "new majority" students include underrepresented ethnic minorities, first-generation college students, students who transfer from community colleges, and working adults with families. Inclusive Excellence is not simply making sure everyone can participate; rather, it means that the institution makes it clear that the students are welcome and are expected to succeed. HHMI continued its partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Pennsylvania State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), in the collaborative Meyerhoff Adaptation Project. The project aims to learn whether elements of UMBC's highly regarded Meyerhoff Scholars Program can be adapted at Penn State and UNC. The participating schools hope to share what they learn so other institutions might follow. During the five-year Meyerhoff Adaptation Project, Penn State and UNC, working closely with UMBC and HHMI, will expand and study the Meyerhoff model, while applying it to newly created programs on their campuses. The HHMI Professors Program empowers accomplished science faculty at leading research universities to apply the rigor and creativity that make them successful in research to important challenges in undergraduate science education. The professors model fundamental reform in the way undergraduate science is taught at research universities through innovative teaching and are encouraged to share ideas and collaborate with their peers to improve science education. Fifty-five scientists have been named HHMI professors since the program began in 2002. In addition to their commitment to student learning, these highly visible scientists have developed new educational resources and implemented novel mentoring programs to support students. In FY2018, HHMI will make awards to a new cohort of HHMI professors. The HHMI's Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP) is designed to encourage talented students to pursue careers in science by placing selected undergraduates in summer research experiences in the labs of HHMI investigators, professors, and at the Janelia Research Campus. In 2017, a total of 85 college students (63 first-year students and 22 second-year, "EXROP Capstone" students) were selected to participate in EXROP. The 2017 cohort marked the 15th year of the program.SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS (A) GRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION AND MEDICAL RESEARCH TRAINING (B) PRECOLLEGE AND UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM (C) EDUCATIONAL MEDIA (D) TANGLED BANK STUDIOS (E) ELIFE - OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL HHMI'S DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION EMPHASIZES INITIATIVES WITH THE POWER TO TRANSFORM GRADUATE, UNDERGRADUATE, AND PRECOLLEGE EDUCATION IN THE LIFE SCIENCES. HHMI IS THE LARGEST PRIVATE FUNDER OF SCIENCE EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. DURING THE FISCAL YEAR, THE INSTITUTE DISTRIBUTED $57 MILLION IN GRANTS TO SUPPORT SCIENCE EDUCATION. The Institute's science education programs support ties between scientific research and teaching with the goal of increasing and enhancing student research opportunities; improving science courses, curricula, and instruction; and providing enhanced graduate and medical training opportunities. Most HHMI grants are awarded through competitions with specific objectives and eligibility criteria and awards are generally made following a stringent process of peer review. HHMI's educational activities are funded through three major programs; the goals of each program and the major activities for the year are summarized below. (A) Graduate Science Education and Medical Research Training These programs focus on the development of innovative graduate education through grants to institutions and fellowships to students. They support research fellowships for medical students, doctoral fellowships for students who are committed to increasing diversity among scientists, doctoral fellowships for international students pursuing the PhD at U.S. institutions. This fiscal year, HHMI selected 66 medical and veterinary students to participate in the Medical Research Fellows Program. The fellowships enable students to take a year off from professional school to conduct laboratory research. The hope is that these students will one day choose to work at the crossroads of basic research and clinical medicine. Six fellows in this year's class of 66 initial awardees are supported by HHMI's funding partners: Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF), Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy (CURE), the Duchenne Research Fund (DRF), and the Society of Interventional Radiology Foundation (SIRF). The program has funded more than 1,700 students since its start in 1989. This year, 13 fellows from the 2015 class are supported by HHMI for an additional year, making it the largest class of second-year fellows in the program's history. The program usually averages six second-year fellows per year. The International Predoctoral Fellowship program identifies accomplished and promising graduate students whose home countries are outside of the United States and who are ineligible for U.S. federal training grant support. Each fellowship is for three years, and pays a stipend, institutional allowance, and research allowance totaling $43,000 per year. In fiscal year 2016, HHMI selected 20 graduate students as International Predoctoral Fellows. HHMI's Gilliam Fellowships for Advanced Study Program awarded 34 fellowships to outstanding students who are pursuing a PhD in the life sciences and who are committed to increasing diversity among scientists. Each fellow will receive an annual award totaling $46,000, which includes a stipend, a training allowance, and an allowance for each fellow's institution, for up to three years. The applicant pool for the Gilliam fellowships consists of graduate students nominated by the principal investigators of non-MSTP T32 training grants awarded through the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), and alumni of HHMI's Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP), an initiative that provides undergraduate minority students with the opportunity to conduct research under the mentorship of HHMI scientists. A total of 142 students applied for the fellowships this year, including 18 EXROP alumni. (B) Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program These programs recruit and develop the future leaders of science and enhance science literacy among all students. Precollege grants support teacher training and inquiry-based student learning. Grants to colleges and universities support undergraduate student research, faculty and curriculum development, and science education outreach activities. In the 2016 fiscal year: HHMI has invited 91 schools to submit full proposals to apply for grants through HHMI's $60 million Inclusive Excellence initiative that is encouraging colleges and universities to broaden access to science excellence for all students. The proposals will be considered for first-round awards that will begin in September 2017. HHMI plans to award approximately 60 grants in two rounds of open competitions, each of which will follow the same format. In this round of the competition, HHMI will award up to 30 grants to institutions that are committed to inclusive science education and are well positioned to work over the next five years to improve their ability to become more inclusive of all students. HHMI's long-term aim is for successful strategies pioneered by the grantee institutions to serve as models to be adapted and adopted by other institutions. The 91 schools were selected from 511 that submitted pre-proposals in response to HHMI's launch of the initiative in May 2015. HHMI continued its partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Pennsylvania State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), to launch the collaborative Meyerhoff Adaptation Project. The project aims to learn whether elements of UMBC's highly regarded Meyerhoff Scholars Program can be adapted at Penn State and UNC. The participating schools hope to share what they learn so other institutions might follow. During the five-year Meyerhoff Adaptation Project, Penn State and UNC, working closely with UMBC and HHMI, will expand and study the Meyerhoff model, while applying it to newly created programs on their campuses. The HHMI Professors Program empowers research scientists who can convey the excitement of science to undergraduates. The professors model fundamental reform in the way undergraduate science is taught at research universities through innovative teaching that demonstrates the rigor and value of scientific research. HHMI professors are committed to expanding and enhancing research opportunities for undergraduates and are encouraged to share ideas and collaborate with their peers to improve science education. Fifty-five scientists have been named HHMI professors since the program began in 2002. In addition to their commitment to student learning, these highly visible scientists have developed new educational resources and implemented novel mentoring programs to support students. In April 2016, HHMI announced a competition to select up to 15 new HHMI professors who will each receive a five-year, nonrenewable grant totaling $1 million; these awards will be made in the fall of 2017. The HHMI's Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP) is designed to encourage talented students to pursue careers in science by placing selected undergraduates in summer research experiences in the labs of HHMI investigators, professors, and at the Janelia Research Campus. In 2016, a total of 102 college students (69 first-year students and 33 second-year, "EXROP Capstone" students) were selected to participate in EXROP. The 2016 cohort marked the 14th year of the program. 
SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS (A) GRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION AND MEDICAL RESEARCH TRAINING (B) PRECOLLEGE AND UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM (C) EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES (D) TANGLED BANK STUDIOS (E) ELIFE - OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL HHMI'S DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION EMPHASIZES INITIATIVES WITH THE POWER TO TRANSFORM GRADUATE, UNDERGRADUATE, AND PRECOLLEGE EDUCATION IN THE SCIENCES. HHMI IS ONE OF THE LARGEST PRIVATE FUNDERS OF SCIENCE EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. DURING THE FISCAL YEAR, THE INSTITUTE DISTRIBUTED $54 MILLION IN GRANTS TO SUPPORT SCIENCE EDUCATION. THE INSTITUTE'S SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS SUPPORT TIES BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND TEACHING WITH THE GOAL OF INCREASING AND ENHANCING STUDENT RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES; IMPROVING SCIENCE COURSES, CURRICULA, AND INSTRUCTION; AND PROVIDING ENHANCED GRADUATE AND PHYSICIAN SCIENTIST TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES. MOST HHMI GRANTS ARE AWARDED THROUGH COMPETITIONS WITH SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES AND ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA AND AWARDS ARE GENERALLY MADE FOLLOWING A STRINGENT PROCESS OF PEER REVIEW. HHMI'S EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES ARE FUNDED THROUGH THREE MAJOR PROGRAMS; THE GOALS OF EACH PROGRAM AND THE MAJOR ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ARE SUMMARIZED BELOW. (A) GRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION AND MEDICAL RESEARCH TRAINING THESE PROGRAMS FOCUS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE GRADUATE EDUCATION THROUGH GRANTS TO INSTITUTIONS AND FELLOWSHIPS TO STUDENTS. THEY SUPPORT RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS, DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE COMMITTED TO INCREASING DIVERSITY AMONG SCIENTISTS, DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS PURSUING PHD AT U.S. INSTITUTIONS, AND AWARDS RESEARCH GRANTS TO PHYSICIAN-SCIENTISTS AT THE OUTSET OF THEIR CAREERS AS INDEPENDENT SCIENTISTS. THIS FISCAL YEAR, HHMI SELECTED 68 MEDICAL AND VETERINARY STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE MEDICAL RESEARCH FELLOWS PROGRAM. THE FELLOWSHIPS ENABLE STUDENTS TO TAKE A YEAR OFF FROM PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL TO CONDUCT LABORATORY RESEARCH. THE HOPE IS THAT THESE STUDENTS WILL ONE DAY CHOOSE TO WORK AT THE CROSSROADS OF BASIC RESEARCH AND CLINICAL MEDICINE. THIS YEAR, HHMI RECEIVED 187 FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS FROM STUDENTS REPRESENTING 76 INSTITUTIONS. EIGHT OF THE 68 FELLOWS WILL BE FUNDED BY HHMI PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS THIS YEAR: AMERICAN GASTROENTEROLOGICAL ASSOCIATION INSTITUTE (AGA), THE BURROUGHS WELLCOME FUND (BWF), CITIZENS UNITED FOR RESEARCH IN EPILEPSY (CURE), THE FOUNDATION FIGHTING BLINDNESS (FFB), THE ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH AND EDUCATION FOUNDATION (OREF) AND THE PARKINSON'S DISEASE FOUNDATION (PDF). THE PROGRAM HAS FUNDED MORE THAN 1,600 STUDENTS SINCE ITS START IN 1989. The International Predoctoral Fellowship program identifies accomplished and promising graduate students whose home countries are outside of the United States and who are ineligible for U.S. federal training grant support. Each fellowship is for three years, and pays a stipend, institutional allowance, and research allowance totaling $43,000 per year. In fiscal year 2015, HHMI selected 45 graduate students as International Predoctoral Fellows. HHMI NEWLY EXPANDED GILLIAM FELLOWSHIPS FOR ADVANCED STUDY PROGRAM HAS AWARDED 30 FELLOWSHIPS TO OUTSTANDING STUDENTS WHO ARE PURSUING A PHD IN THE LIFE SCIENCES AND WHO ARE COMMITTED TO INCREASING DIVERSITY AMONG SCIENTISTS. EACH FELLOW WILL RECEIVE AN ANNUAL AWARD TOTALING $43,000, WHICH INCLUDES A STIPEND, A TRAINING ALLOWANCE, AND AN ALLOWANCE FOR EACH FELLOW'S INSTITUTION, FOR UP TO THREE YEARS. PREVIOUSLY, HHMI SELECTED BETWEEN FIVE AND NINE GILLIAM FELLOWS PER YEAR. A TOTAL OF 62 STUDENTS WERE AWARDED GILLIAM FELLOWSHIPS DURING THE PROGRAM'S FIRST TEN YEARS. All of the previous Gilliam fellows were alumni of HHMI's Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP), an initiative that provides undergraduate minority students with the opportunity to conduct research under the mentorship of HHMI scientists. In addition to EXROP alumni, the applicant pool was expanded to include graduate students nominated by the principal investigators of non-MSTP T32 training grants awarded through the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS). A total of 119 students applied for the fellowships this year, including 20 EXROP alumni. In 2015, HHMI awarded grants totaling $7 million to the Marine Biological Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and Jackson Laboratory to support advanced courses at each institution. The support aims to strengthen U.S. science education by supporting outstanding advanced courses that are available to biomedical science trainees. (B) PRECOLLEGE AND UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM These programs recruit and develop the future leaders of science and enhance science literacy among all students. Precollege grants support teacher training and inquiry-based student learning. Grants to colleges and universities support undergraduate student research, faculty and curriculum development, and science education outreach activities. Through the HHMI Professors Program, HHMI provides support to distinguished scientists with a commitment to teaching. In the 2015 fiscal year: Through the "Sustaining Excellence" initiative HHMI awarded to 37 research universities grants to support undergraduate science education. The objective of this initiative is to encourage universities to devise and implement effective strategies aimed at increasing the persistence of students from all backgrounds in science. HHMI CONTINUED ITS PARTNERSHIP WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY (UMBC), THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY (PENN STATE), AND THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL (UNC), TO LAUNCH THE COLLABORATIVE MEYERHOFF ADAPTATION PROJECT. THE PROJECT AIMS TO LEARN WHETHER ELEMENTS OF UMBC'S HIGHLY REGARDED MEYERHOFF SCHOLARS PROGRAM CAN BE ADAPTED AT PENN STATE AND UNC. THE PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS HOPE TO SHARE WHAT THEY LEARN SO OTHER INSTITUTIONS MIGHT FOLLOW. DURING THE FIVE-YEAR MEYERHOFF ADAPTATION PROJECT, PENN STATE AND UNC, WORKING CLOSELY WITH UMBC AND HHMI, WILL EXPAND AND STUDY THE MEYERHOFF MODEL, WHILE APPLYING IT TO NEWLY CREATED PROGRAMS ON THEIR CAMPUSES. In the fall of 2014 and after an extensive competition, HHMI named fifteen scientists HHMI Professors, bringing the total number of professors to 55. HHMI Professors are accomplished academic scientists who apply the creativity and rigor that characterizes their science to important challenges in undergraduate science education. Each professor is awarded a five-year grant totaling $1 million. The HHMI EXROP program is designed to encourage talented students to pursue careers in science by placing selected undergraduates in summer research experiences in the labs of HHMI investigators, professors, and at the Janelia Research Campus. In 2015, a total of 66 college students were selected to participate in HHMI's Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP). The program also supported 31 EXROP "Capstone" students - all of whom were in the 2014 EXROP cohort and were offered the opportunity to have a second summer in the research laboratory. The 2015 cohort marked the 13th year of the program. HHMI also announced and commenced funding a five-year, $2.3 million grant to support educational activities and infrastructure development at the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique. The program will be carried out through the Gorongosa Restoration Project (GRP), a U.S. philanthropy that has led extraordinary efforts to restore Gorongosa National Park over the last ten years. The GRP has been on the frontlines in combatting the loss of biodiversity - one of most important biological and environmental issues in the world today. HHMI funding will be used to support personnel, new educational programs, and classroom infrastructure at the E. O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in the Park.
Program expenses  $61,372,009.00
Grants and allocations made  $39,906,180.00
Program description  SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS (A) GRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION AND MEDICAL RESEARCH TRAINING (B) PRECOLLEGE AND UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM (C) EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES (D) TANGLED BANK STUDIOS (E) ELIFE - OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL HHMI'S DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE EDUCATION EMPHASIZES INITIATIVES WITH THE POWER TO TRANSFORM GRADUATE, UNDERGRADUATE, AND PRECOLLEGE EDUCATION IN THE SCIENCES. HHMI IS ONE OF THE LARGEST PRIVATE FUNDERS OF SCIENCE EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. DURING THE FISCAL YEAR, THE INSTITUTE DISTRIBUTED $54 MILLION IN GRANTS TO SUPPORT SCIENCE EDUCATION. THE INSTITUTE'S SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS SUPPORT TIES BETWEEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND TEACHING WITH THE GOAL OF INCREASING AND ENHANCING STUDENT RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES; IMPROVING SCIENCE COURSES, CURRICULA, AND INSTRUCTION; AND PROVIDING ENHANCED GRADUATE AND PHYSICIAN SCIENTIST TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES. MOST HHMI GRANTS ARE AWARDED THROUGH COMPETITIONS WITH SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES AND ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA AND AWARDS ARE GENERALLY MADE FOLLOWING A STRINGENT PROCESS OF PEER REVIEW. HHMI'S EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES ARE FUNDED THROUGH THREE MAJOR PROGRAMS; THE GOALS OF EACH PROGRAM AND THE MAJOR ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ARE SUMMARIZED BELOW. (A) GRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION AND MEDICAL RESEARCH TRAINING THESE PROGRAMS FOCUS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE GRADUATE EDUCATION THROUGH GRANTS TO INSTITUTIONS AND FELLOWSHIPS TO STUDENTS. THEY SUPPORT RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS FOR MEDICAL STUDENTS, DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE COMMITTED TO INCREASING DIVERSITY AMONG SCIENTISTS, DOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS PURSUING PHD AT U.S. INSTITUTIONS, AND AWARDS RESEARCH GRANTS TO PHYSICIAN-SCIENTISTS AT THE OUTSET OF THEIR CAREERS AS INDEPENDENT SCIENTISTS. THIS FISCAL YEAR, HHMI SELECTED 68 MEDICAL AND VETERINARY STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE MEDICAL RESEARCH FELLOWS PROGRAM. THE FELLOWSHIPS ENABLE STUDENTS TO TAKE A YEAR OFF FROM PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL TO CONDUCT LABORATORY RESEARCH. THE HOPE IS THAT THESE STUDENTS WILL ONE DAY CHOOSE TO WORK AT THE CROSSROADS OF BASIC RESEARCH AND CLINICAL MEDICINE. THIS YEAR, HHMI RECEIVED 187 FELLOWSHIP APPLICATIONS FROM STUDENTS REPRESENTING 76 INSTITUTIONS. EIGHT OF THE 68 FELLOWS WILL BE FUNDED BY HHMI PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS THIS YEAR: AMERICAN GASTROENTEROLOGICAL ASSOCIATION INSTITUTE (AGA), THE BURROUGHS WELLCOME FUND (BWF), CITIZENS UNITED FOR RESEARCH IN EPILEPSY (CURE), THE FOUNDATION FIGHTING BLINDNESS (FFB), THE ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH AND EDUCATION FOUNDATION (OREF) AND THE PARKINSON'S DISEASE FOUNDATION (PDF). THE PROGRAM HAS FUNDED MORE THAN 1,600 STUDENTS SINCE ITS START IN 1989. The International Predoctoral Fellowship program identifies accomplished and promising graduate students whose home countries are outside of the United States and who are ineligible for U.S. federal training grant support. Each fellowship is for three years, and pays a stipend, institutional allowance, and research allowance totaling $43,000 per year. In fiscal year 2015, HHMI selected 45 graduate students as International Predoctoral Fellows. HHMI NEWLY EXPANDED GILLIAM FELLOWSHIPS FOR ADVANCED STUDY PROGRAM HAS AWARDED 30 FELLOWSHIPS TO OUTSTANDING STUDENTS WHO ARE PURSUING A PHD IN THE LIFE SCIENCES AND WHO ARE COMMITTED TO INCREASING DIVERSITY AMONG SCIENTISTS. EACH FELLOW WILL RECEIVE AN ANNUAL AWARD TOTALING $43,000, WHICH INCLUDES A STIPEND, A TRAINING ALLOWANCE, AND AN ALLOWANCE FOR EACH FELLOW'S INSTITUTION, FOR UP TO THREE YEARS. PREVIOUSLY, HHMI SELECTED BETWEEN FIVE AND NINE GILLIAM FELLOWS PER YEAR. A TOTAL OF 62 STUDENTS WERE AWARDED GILLIAM FELLOWSHIPS DURING THE PROGRAM'S FIRST TEN YEARS. All of the previous Gilliam fellows were alumni of HHMI's Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP), an initiative that provides undergraduate minority students with the opportunity to conduct research under the mentorship of HHMI scientists. In addition to EXROP alumni, the applicant pool was expanded to include graduate students nominated by the principal investigators of non-MSTP T32 training grants awarded through the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS). A total of 119 students applied for the fellowships this year, including 20 EXROP alumni. In 2015, HHMI awarded grants totaling $7 million to the Marine Biological Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and Jackson Laboratory to support advanced courses at each institution. The support aims to strengthen U.S. science education by supporting outstanding advanced courses that are available to biomedical science trainees. (B) PRECOLLEGE AND UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAM These programs recruit and develop the future leaders of science and enhance science literacy among all students. Precollege grants support teacher training and inquiry-based student learning. Grants to colleges and universities support undergraduate student research, faculty and curriculum development, and science education outreach activities. Through the HHMI Professors Program, HHMI provides support to distinguished scientists with a commitment to teaching. In the 2015 fiscal year: Through the "Sustaining Excellence" initiative HHMI awarded to 37 research universities grants to support undergraduate science education. The objective of this initiative is to encourage universities to devise and implement effective strategies aimed at increasing the persistence of students from all backgrounds in science. HHMI CONTINUED ITS PARTNERSHIP WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY (UMBC), THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY (PENN STATE), AND THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL (UNC), TO LAUNCH THE COLLABORATIVE MEYERHOFF ADAPTATION PROJECT. THE PROJECT AIMS TO LEARN WHETHER ELEMENTS OF UMBC'S HIGHLY REGARDED MEYERHOFF SCHOLARS PROGRAM CAN BE ADAPTED AT PENN STATE AND UNC. THE PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS HOPE TO SHARE WHAT THEY LEARN SO OTHER INSTITUTIONS MIGHT FOLLOW. DURING THE FIVE-YEAR MEYERHOFF ADAPTATION PROJECT, PENN STATE AND UNC, WORKING CLOSELY WITH UMBC AND HHMI, WILL EXPAND AND STUDY THE MEYERHOFF MODEL, WHILE APPLYING IT TO NEWLY CREATED PROGRAMS ON THEIR CAMPUSES. In the fall of 2014 and after an extensive competition, HHMI named fifteen scientists HHMI Professors, bringing the total number of professors to 55. HHMI Professors are accomplished academic scientists who apply the creativity and rigor that characterizes their science to important challenges in undergraduate science education. Each professor is awarded a five-year grant totaling $1 million. The HHMI EXROP program is designed to encourage talented students to pursue careers in science by placing selected undergraduates in summer research experiences in the labs of HHMI investigators, professors, and at the Janelia Research Campus. In 2015, a total of 66 college students were selected to participate in HHMI's Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP). The program also supported 31 EXROP "Capstone" students - all of whom were in the 2014 EXROP cohort and were offered the opportunity to have a second summer in the research laboratory. The 2015 cohort marked the 13th year of the program. HHMI also announced and commenced funding a five-year, $2.3 million grant to support educational activities and infrastructure development at the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park, Mozambique. The program will be carried out through the Gorongosa Restoration Project (GRP), a U.S. philanthropy that has led extraordinary efforts to restore Gorongosa National Park over the last ten years. The GRP has been on the frontlines in combatting the loss of biodiversity - one of most important biological and environmental issues in the world today. HHMI funding will be used to support personnel, new educational programs, and classroom infrastructure at the E. O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in the Park.
SUPPORT FOR INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE (A) NEW INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM (B) SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM (C) INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTIST PROGRAM (D) AFRICA HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE IN SOUTH AFRICA (A) New International Research Scholars Program Forty-one scientists from 16 countries have been chosen as International Research Scholars, exceptional early-career scientists poised to advance biomedical research across the globe. HHMI teamed up with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation to develop scientific talent around the world, and will award a total of nearly $26.7 million to this group of scholars. Each researcher will receive a total of $650,000 over five years. The award is a big boon for scientists early in their careers, and offers the freedom to pursue new research directions and creative projects that could develop into top-notch scientific programs. (B) Senior International Research Scholars Program HHMI continues to support 13 of the world's leading basic science researchers as Senior International Research Scholar (SIRS). The awards support outstanding biomedical scientists working outside the United States who have made significant contributions to fundamental research in the biological sciences. The SIRS awardees, selected from a group of previous HHMI international research scholars, are respected leaders in their fields. Each HHMI senior international research scholar receives a grant of $100,000 per year over five years, and presents their research at scientific meetings held at HHMI. The gatherings are intended to facilitate the exchange of ideas, stimulate new research, and provide an opportunity for collaboration with other HHMI scientists. The senior international research scholars' participation helps strengthen the growing network of international biomedical researchers. (C) International Early Career Scientist Program HHMI continues to support 24 international early career scientists who were selected for awards in 2012. Each selected scientist will receive $650,000 over a period of five years with the goal of helping these talented individuals establish independent research programs. In this pilot program, HHMI identified scientists who are, or have the potential to become, scientific leaders. The 24 HHMI international early career scientists conduct research at 20 institutions in 12 countries. Each scientist who was selected had directed his or her own laboratory for less than seven years when they applied to HHMI. The countries represented by the HHMI international early career scientists are Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, Hungary, India, Italy, Poland, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, and South Korea. (D) Africa Health Research Institute in South Africa In 2009, HHMI helped launch the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for TB-HIV (K-RITH) in collaboration with the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), and has provided significant funding to support its research efforts. In 2016, in a move to improve the health of people locally and globally, K-RITH joined forces with the Africa Centre for Population Health to form a groundbreaking new interdisciplinary institute to fight tuberculosis (TB), HIV and related diseases. The new organization, the Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI), is located at the heart of South Africa's TB and HIV co-epidemic in KwaZulu-Natal Province. The effort brings together the Africa Centre's detailed population data from over 100,000 participants, with K-RITH's expertise in basic science and its world-class laboratory facilities. HHMI, together with the Wellcome Trust, continues to provide grant support to AHRI, with the University College London and UKZN serving as significant academic partners. AHRI is committed to working towards the elimination of HIV and TB. To achieve this, the institute will bring together leading researchers from different fields, use cutting-edge science to improve people's health, and will help to train the next generation of African scientists.
Program expenses$35,913,012.00$20,914,932.00 
Grants and allocations made$34,875,000.00$20,801,000.00 
Program revenue $0.00 
Program descriptionSUPPORT FOR INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE (A) NEW INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM (B) SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM (C) INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTIST PROGRAM (D) AFRICA HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE IN SOUTH AFRICA (A) New International Research Scholars Program Forty-one scientists from 16 countries have been chosen as International Research Scholars, exceptional early-career scientists poised to advance biomedical research across the globe. HHMI teamed up with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation to develop scientific talent around the world, and will award a total of nearly $26.7 million to this group of scholars. Each researcher will receive a total of $650,000 over five years. The award is a big boon for scientists early in their careers, and offers the freedom to pursue new research directions and creative projects that could develop into top-notch scientific programs. (B) Senior International Research Scholars Program HHMI continues to support 13 of the world's leading basic science researchers as Senior International Research Scholar (SIRS). The awards support outstanding biomedical scientists working outside the United States who have made significant contributions to fundamental research in the biological sciences. The SIRS awardees, selected from a group of previous HHMI international research scholars, are respected leaders in their fields. Each HHMI senior international research scholar receives a grant of $100,000 per year over five years, and presents their research at scientific meetings held at HHMI. The gatherings are intended to facilitate the exchange of ideas, stimulate new research, and provide an opportunity for collaboration with other HHMI scientists. The senior international research scholars' participation helps strengthen the growing network of international biomedical researchers. (C) International Early Career Scientist Program HHMI continues to support 24 international early career scientists who were selected for awards in 2012. Each selected scientist will receive $650,000 over a period of five years with the goal of helping these talented individuals establish independent research programs. In this pilot program, HHMI identified scientists who are, or have the potential to become, scientific leaders. The 24 HHMI international early career scientists conduct research at 20 institutions in 12 countries. Each scientist who was selected had directed his or her own laboratory for less than seven years when they applied to HHMI. The countries represented by the HHMI international early career scientists are Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, Hungary, India, Italy, Poland, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, and South Korea. (D) Africa Health Research Institute in South Africa In 2009, HHMI helped launch the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for TB-HIV (K-RITH) in collaboration with the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), and has provided significant funding to support its research efforts. In 2016, in a move to improve the health of people locally and globally, K-RITH joined forces with the Africa Centre for Population Health to form a groundbreaking new interdisciplinary institute to fight tuberculosis (TB), HIV and related diseases. The new organization, the Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI), is located at the heart of South Africa's TB and HIV co-epidemic in KwaZulu-Natal Province. The effort brings together the Africa Centre's detailed population data from over 100,000 participants, with K-RITH's expertise in basic science and its world-class laboratory facilities. HHMI, together with the Wellcome Trust, continues to provide grant support to AHRI, with the University College London and UKZN serving as significant academic partners. AHRI is committed to working towards the elimination of HIV and TB. To achieve this, the institute will bring together leading researchers from different fields, use cutting-edge science to improve people's health, and will help to train the next generation of African scientists.SUPPORT FOR INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE (A) NEW INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM (B) SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM (C) INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTIST PROGRAM (D) AFRICA HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE LAUNCHES IN SOUTH AFRICA (A) New International Research Scholars Program HHMI, together with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, announced an international program to provide research support for up to 40 outstanding early career scientists. The program's aim is to help develop scientific talent worldwide in a wide variety of biomedical research fields. Awardees will be notified in April 2017. HHMI and its partners have committed a total of $30 million for the International Research Scholars Program and will award each scientist who is selected a total of $650,000 over five years. The competition is open to scientists who have trained in the U.S. or United Kingdom for at least one year and who have run their own labs for less than seven years. (B) Senior International Research Scholars Program HHMI continues to support 13 of the world's leading basic science researchers as Senior International Research Scholar (SIRS). The awards support outstanding biomedical scientists working outside the United States who have made significant contributions to fundamental research in the biological sciences. The SIRS awardees, selected from a group of previous HHMI international research scholars, are respected leaders in their fields. Each HHMI senior international research scholar receives a grant of $100,000 per year over five years, and presents their research at scientific meetings held at HHMI. The gatherings are intended to facilitate the exchange of ideas, stimulate new research, and provide an opportunity for collaboration with other HHMI scientists. The senior international research scholars' participation helps strengthen the growing network of international biomedical researchers. (C) International Early Career Scientist Program HHMI continues to support 24 international early career scientists who were selected for awards in 2012. Each selected scientist will receive $650,000 over a period of five years with the goal of helping these talented individuals establish independent research programs. In this pilot program, HHMI identified scientists who are, or have the potential to become, scientific leaders. The 24 HHMI international early career scientists conduct research at 20 institutions in 12 countries. Each scientist who was selected had directed his or her own laboratory for less than seven years when they applied to HHMI. The countries represented by the HHMI international early career scientists are Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, Hungary, India, Italy, Poland, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, and South Korea. (D) Africa Health Research Institute Launches in South Africa In 2009, HHMI helped launch the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for TB-HIV (K-RITH) in collaboration with the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), and has provided significant funding to support its research efforts. In 2016, in a move to improve the health of people locally and globally, K-RITH joined forces with the Africa Centre for Population Health to form a groundbreaking new interdisciplinary institute to fight tuberculosis (TB), HIV and related diseases. The new organization, the Africa Health Research Institute, is located at the heart of South Africa's TB and HIV co-epidemic in KwaZulu-Natal Province. The effort brings together the Africa Centre's detailed population data from over 100,000 participants, with K-RITH's expertise in basic science and its world-class laboratory facilities. The new venture is made possible through grants from HHMI and Wellcome Trust, with the University College London and UKZN as significant academic partners. The Africa Health Research Institute is committed to working towards the elimination of HIV and TB. To achieve this, the institute will bring together leading researchers from different fields, use cutting-edge science to improve people's health, and will help to train the next generation of African scientists. 
SUPPORT FOR INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE (A) SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM (B) INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTIST PROGRAM (C) THE KWAZULU-NATAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV (K-RITH) (A) SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM HHMI CONTINUES TO SUPPORT 13 OF THE WORLD'S LEADING BASIC SCIENCE RESEARCHERS AS SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLAR (SIRS). THE AWARDS SUPPORT OUTSTANDING BIOMEDICAL SCIENTISTS WORKING OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES WHO HAVE MADE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. THE SIRS AWARDEES, SELECTED FROM A GROUP OF PREVIOUS HHMI INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS, ARE RESPECTED LEADERS IN THEIR FIELDS. EACH HHMI SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLAR RECEIVES A GRANT OF $100,000 PER YEAR OVER FIVE YEARS, AND PRESENTS THEIR RESEARCH AT SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS HELD AT HHMI. THE GATHERINGS ARE INTENDED TO FACILITATE THE EXCHANGE OF IDEAS, STIMULATE NEW RESEARCH, AND PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR COLLABORATION WITH OTHER HHMI SCIENTISTS. THE SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS' PARTICIPATION HELPS STRENGTHEN THE GROWING NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL RESEARCHERS. (B) INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTIST PROGRAM HHMI ALSO CONTINUES TO SUPPORT 28 INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTISTS WHO WERE SELECTED FOR AWARDS IN 2012. EACH SELECTED SCIENTIST WILL RECEIVE $650,000 OVER A PERIOD OF FIVE YEARS WITH THE GOAL OF HELPING THESE TALENTED INDIVIDUALS ESTABLISH INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROGRAMS. IN THIS PILOT PROGRAM, HHMI IDENTIFIED SCIENTISTS WHO ARE, OR HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO BECOME, SCIENTIFIC LEADERS. THE 28 HHMI INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTISTS CONDUCT RESEARCH AT 22 INSTITUTIONS IN 12 COUNTRIES. EACH SCIENTIST WHO WAS SELECTED HAD DIRECTED HIS OR HER OWN LABORATORY FOR LESS THAN SEVEN YEARS WHEN THEY APPLIED TO HHMI. THE COUNTRIES REPRESENTED BY THE HHMI INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTISTS ARE ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, CHILE, CHINA, HUNGARY, INDIA, ITALY, POLAND, PORTUGAL, SOUTH AFRICA, SPAIN, AND SOUTH KOREA. (C) THE KWAZULU-NATAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV (K-RITH) HHMI, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL (UKZN) IN SOUTH AFRICA, HAS ESTABLISHED AN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH CENTER FOCUSED ON MAKING MAJOR SCIENTIFIC CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE WORLDWIDE EFFORT TO CONTROL THE DEVASTATING CO-EPIDEMIC OF TUBERCULOSIS (TB) AND HIV. THE KWAZULU-NATAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV (K-RITH) IS AN INDEPENDENT NON-PROFIT ASSOCIATION INCORPORATED UNDER SOUTH AFRICAN LAW. IT IS PLACING A MAJOR EMPHASIS ON ESTABLISHING A WORLD-CLASS RESEARCH PROGRAM FOCUSED ON THE SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERIES ABOUT THE INFECTING ORGANISMS AND HELPING TO TRAIN A NEW GENERATION OF SCIENTISTS IN AFRICA. HHMI HAS COMMITTED OVER $70 MILLION TO K-RITH OVER 10 YEARS, INCLUDING SUPPORT PROVIDED DURING ITS FISCAL YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2015. UKZN IS MAKING SUBSTANTIAL FINANCIAL AND IN-KIND COMMITMENTS TO K-RITH AS WELL. THE NEED FOR MORE RESEARCH ON TB AND HIV IS SUBSTANTIAL. SOUTH AFRICA HAS MORE RESIDENTS INFECTED WITH HIV THAN ANY OTHER NATION IN THE WORLD. IN ADDITION, IT HAS ONE OF THE HIGHEST PER CAPITA RATES OF TB IN THE WORLD. K-RITH FORMALLY OPENED ITS NEW RESEARCH BUILDING IN OCTOBER 2012 ON THE CAMPUS OF THE NELSON R. MANDELA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE IN DURBAN, AND IS PRODUCTIVELY ENGAGED IN HIV AND TB RESEARCH.
Program expenses  $7,004,212.00
Grants and allocations made  $7,004,212.00
Program description  SUPPORT FOR INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE (A) SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM (B) INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTIST PROGRAM (C) THE KWAZULU-NATAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV (K-RITH) (A) SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS PROGRAM HHMI CONTINUES TO SUPPORT 13 OF THE WORLD'S LEADING BASIC SCIENCE RESEARCHERS AS SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLAR (SIRS). THE AWARDS SUPPORT OUTSTANDING BIOMEDICAL SCIENTISTS WORKING OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES WHO HAVE MADE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. THE SIRS AWARDEES, SELECTED FROM A GROUP OF PREVIOUS HHMI INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS, ARE RESPECTED LEADERS IN THEIR FIELDS. EACH HHMI SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLAR RECEIVES A GRANT OF $100,000 PER YEAR OVER FIVE YEARS, AND PRESENTS THEIR RESEARCH AT SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS HELD AT HHMI. THE GATHERINGS ARE INTENDED TO FACILITATE THE EXCHANGE OF IDEAS, STIMULATE NEW RESEARCH, AND PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR COLLABORATION WITH OTHER HHMI SCIENTISTS. THE SENIOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARS' PARTICIPATION HELPS STRENGTHEN THE GROWING NETWORK OF INTERNATIONAL BIOMEDICAL RESEARCHERS. (B) INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTIST PROGRAM HHMI ALSO CONTINUES TO SUPPORT 28 INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTISTS WHO WERE SELECTED FOR AWARDS IN 2012. EACH SELECTED SCIENTIST WILL RECEIVE $650,000 OVER A PERIOD OF FIVE YEARS WITH THE GOAL OF HELPING THESE TALENTED INDIVIDUALS ESTABLISH INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROGRAMS. IN THIS PILOT PROGRAM, HHMI IDENTIFIED SCIENTISTS WHO ARE, OR HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO BECOME, SCIENTIFIC LEADERS. THE 28 HHMI INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTISTS CONDUCT RESEARCH AT 22 INSTITUTIONS IN 12 COUNTRIES. EACH SCIENTIST WHO WAS SELECTED HAD DIRECTED HIS OR HER OWN LABORATORY FOR LESS THAN SEVEN YEARS WHEN THEY APPLIED TO HHMI. THE COUNTRIES REPRESENTED BY THE HHMI INTERNATIONAL EARLY CAREER SCIENTISTS ARE ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, CHILE, CHINA, HUNGARY, INDIA, ITALY, POLAND, PORTUGAL, SOUTH AFRICA, SPAIN, AND SOUTH KOREA. (C) THE KWAZULU-NATAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV (K-RITH) HHMI, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL (UKZN) IN SOUTH AFRICA, HAS ESTABLISHED AN INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH CENTER FOCUSED ON MAKING MAJOR SCIENTIFIC CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE WORLDWIDE EFFORT TO CONTROL THE DEVASTATING CO-EPIDEMIC OF TUBERCULOSIS (TB) AND HIV. THE KWAZULU-NATAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV (K-RITH) IS AN INDEPENDENT NON-PROFIT ASSOCIATION INCORPORATED UNDER SOUTH AFRICAN LAW. IT IS PLACING A MAJOR EMPHASIS ON ESTABLISHING A WORLD-CLASS RESEARCH PROGRAM FOCUSED ON THE SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERIES ABOUT THE INFECTING ORGANISMS AND HELPING TO TRAIN A NEW GENERATION OF SCIENTISTS IN AFRICA. HHMI HAS COMMITTED OVER $70 MILLION TO K-RITH OVER 10 YEARS, INCLUDING SUPPORT PROVIDED DURING ITS FISCAL YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2015. UKZN IS MAKING SUBSTANTIAL FINANCIAL AND IN-KIND COMMITMENTS TO K-RITH AS WELL. THE NEED FOR MORE RESEARCH ON TB AND HIV IS SUBSTANTIAL. SOUTH AFRICA HAS MORE RESIDENTS INFECTED WITH HIV THAN ANY OTHER NATION IN THE WORLD. IN ADDITION, IT HAS ONE OF THE HIGHEST PER CAPITA RATES OF TB IN THE WORLD. K-RITH FORMALLY OPENED ITS NEW RESEARCH BUILDING IN OCTOBER 2012 ON THE CAMPUS OF THE NELSON R. MANDELA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE IN DURBAN, AND IS PRODUCTIVELY ENGAGED IN HIV AND TB RESEARCH.
Financial data
Expense categories (totals)
Sum (total functional expenses)$1,043,453,921.00$1,133,477,188.00$1,013,599,225.00
Program services (total functional expenses)$783,268,249.00$879,899,696.00$786,192,206.00
Management & general (total functional expenses)$260,185,672.00$253,577,492.00$227,407,019.00
Fundraising (total functional expenses)$0.00$0.00$0.00
Revenue
Total revenue$1,550,547,891.00$1,200,320,873.00$1,982,566,539.00
Program service revenue (total)$2,593,242.00$2,223,162.00$2,033,219.00
Revenue from contributions (total)$961,418.00$19,321,241.00$66,401.00
Investment income$1,525,605,714.00$921,724,327.00$1,963,222,595.00
Total unrelated business revenue$19,685,078.00-$1,833,057.00$11,677,878.00
Other revenue, current yr$21,387,517.00$257,052,143.00$17,244,324.00
Net unrelated business taxable revenue$0.00$0.00$0.00
Total revenue from grants, etc., current yr$961,418.00$19,321,241.00$66,401.00
Gross receipts$48,467,077,301.00$60,901,814,102.00$49,190,053,351.00
Sources of contributions
Revenue from all other contributions$961,418.00$19,321,241.00$66,401.00
Other types of revenue
Royalties (total)$21,446,583.00$256,701,667.00$14,769,577.00
Miscellaneous revenue (total)$762,837.00$1,007,392.00$2,972,595.00
Income from dividends, interest, and similar investments$192,721,183.00$204,038,300.00$202,888,991.00
Net rental income-$821,903.00-$656,916.00-$497,848.00
Fees for services
Lobbying fees (total)$15,000.00  
Legal fees (total)$3,452,762.00$3,710,170.00$3,706,232.00
Fundraising service fees (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00
Investment management fees (total)$69,931,386.00$67,458,786.00$71,304,521.00
Accounting service fees (total)$959,641.00$971,762.00$852,024.00
Assets and liabilities
Total assets$22,594,415,758.00$21,082,502,290.00$21,693,736,438.00
Total assets, beginning of year$21,082,502,290.00$21,693,736,438.00$21,860,329,641.00
Total liabilities$3,285,217,733.00$3,306,942,737.00$3,522,501,322.00
Total liabilities, beginning of year$3,306,942,737.00$3,522,501,322.00$3,266,722,975.00
Loans & receivables from key persons$0.00$0.00 
Net assets$19,309,198,025.00$17,775,559,553.00$18,171,235,116.00
Net assets, beginning of year$17,775,559,553.00$18,171,235,116.00$18,593,606,666.00
Other liabilities$657,102,151.00$638,986,054.00$955,978,144.00
Bond liabilities$716,130,000.00$716,130,000.00$716,130,000.00
Other assets$278,738,241.00$312,429,699.00$286,638,422.00
Investments: other securities$14,044,326,015.00$13,078,172,731.00$13,361,529,118.00
Investments: publicly traded securities$7,234,725,303.00$6,611,550,109.00$7,011,005,370.00
Grants payable$173,350,134.00$161,167,676.00$118,378,619.00
Other financial variables
Revenue less expenses$507,093,970.00$66,843,685.00$968,967,314.00
Savings & temp cash investment$313,788,984.00$331,496,720.00$261,159,459.00
Prepaid expenses & deferred charges$10,916,217.00$10,034,921.00$12,181,144.00
Accounts payable & accrued expenses$503,181,931.00$555,985,053.00$493,609,336.00
Unsecured notes & loans to unrelated parties$1,235,453,517.00$1,234,673,954.00$1,238,405,223.00
Total net assets or fund balances$19,309,198,025.00$17,775,559,553.00$18,171,235,116.00
Depreciation, depletion, amortization$80,354,035.00$84,426,346.00$92,631,771.00
Governance and accountability
Number of voting members101010
Number of independent voting members101010
Financial sheets auditedTrueTrueTrue
Audit on consolidated basisTrueTrueTrue
Tax year start date2016-09-012015-09-012014-09-01
Tax year end date2017-08-312016-08-312015-08-31
Accounting methodAccrualAccrualAccrual
Indicators for schedules (selected)
LobbiedTrueTrueTrue
Grants to domestic org/gov't >$5kTrueTrueTrue
Org has controlled entityTrueTrueTrue
Org transacted with controlled entityTrueTrueTrue
Metadata about the filing
E-return type990990990
Date e-filing submitted2018-05-162017-09-072016-07-21
IRS schema version2016v3.02015v3.02014v6.0
Filing identifier201801109349300120201721099349300802201630679349300208
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