Japanese American National Museum

Address
369 E First Street
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Contact
Website: http://www.janm.org
Phone: +1 (213) 625-0414
Nonprofit
NTEE: A53 - Arts, culture and humanities
EIN: 95-3966024

Mission

The mission of the Japanese American National Museum (the National Museum) is to promote understanding and appreciation of America's ethic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience.
 20172016201520142013
Basic features of the organization
Year of formation1985
Subsection code03
PF filing required0    
Metropolitan statistical area4472
Form of organization
CorporationTrue
Human resources, including compensation
Summary compensation info
Total compensation of current key personnel$175,457.00$216,283.00$216,759.00 $192,016.00
Sum of reportable (W2/1099) compensation$324,077.00$182,127.00$205,506.00 $207,007.00
Number of employees636669 60
Number of people compensated >$100k111 1
Number of volunteers125125119 200
Number of highly compensated contractors446  
Personnel
Bannai, Kathryn
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee  
Name of key/compensated personKathryn A BannaiKathryn A BannaiKathryn A Bannai  
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue  
Average hours per week working for org1.231.230.90  
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00  
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00  
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00  
Burroughs, Natalie
TitlePresident/CEOPresident/CEO   
Name of key/compensated personNatalie A BurroughsNatalie A Burroughs   
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrue   
Average hours per week working for org65.0040.00   
Reportable compensation from org$91,610.00$0.00   
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$1,799.00$0.00   
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00   
Doizaki, Ernest
Title    Asst Secretary and Chairman Emeritus
Name of key/compensated person    Ernest Y Doizaki
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director    True
Average hours per week working for org    2.00
Reportable compensation from org    $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs    $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs     $0.00
Edd, Sybil
Title    Trustee
Name of key/compensated person    Sybil J Hampton EDD
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director    True
Average hours per week working for org    1.00
Reportable compensation from org    $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs    $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs     $0.00
Fitz-Horioka, Linda
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personLinda Fitz-HoriokaLinda Fitz-HoriokaLinda Fitz-Horioka Linda Fitz-Horioka
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org1.591.591.60 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Fujioka, Robert
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personRobert T FujiokaRobert T FujiokaRobert T Fujioka Robert T Fujioka
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org0.770.770.70 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Fukumura, Koji
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personKoji F Fukumura EsqKoji F Fukumura EsqKoji F Fukumura Esq Koji F Fukumura Esq
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org1.041.040.90 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Fukunaga, Mark
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personMark H FukunagaMark H FukunagaMark H Fukunaga Mark H Fukunaga
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org0.000.000.00 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Furukawa, Leslie
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personLeslie K FurukawaLeslie K FurukawaLeslie K Furukawa Esq Leslie K Furukawa Esq
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org0.790.791.20 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Gordon, Mariko
Title  Trustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated person  Mariko Gordon Mariko Gordon
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director  True True
Average hours per week working for org  0.10 1.00
Reportable compensation from org  $0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs  $0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs   $0.00 $0.00
Goto, Douglas
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personDouglas M GotoDouglas M GotoDouglas M Goto Douglas M Goto
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org0.690.690.60 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Hallock, Meloni
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee  
Name of key/compensated personMeloni HallockMeloni HallockMeloni Hallock  
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue  
Average hours per week working for org1.081.081.00  
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00  
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00  
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00  
Hamamura, Ken
TitleTrustee    
Name of key/compensated personKen Hamamura    
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrue    
Average hours per week working for org0.23    
Reportable compensation from org$0.00    
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00    
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00    
Kagawa, Stephen
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personStephen L KagawaStephen L KagawaStephen L Kagawa Stephen L Kagawa
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org0.960.960.90 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Kimura, Gregory
TitleFormer President/CEOFormer President/CEOPresident/CEO President/CEO
Name of key/compensated personGregory W KimuraGregory W KimuraGregory W Kimura Gregory W Kimura
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director TrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org40.0040.0040.00 40.00
Reportable compensation from org$232,467.00$182,127.00$205,506.00 $166,626.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$6,606.00$14,155.00$8,009.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Lee, Randall
TitleVice-ChairVice-ChairTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personRandall R LeeRandall R LeeRandall R Lee Randall R Lee Esq
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org1.111.111.30 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Mineta, Norman
TitleChairChairTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personThe Honorable Norman Y MinetaThe Honorable Norman Y MinetaThe Honorable Norman Y Mineta The Honorable Norman Y Mineta
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org5.775.770.90 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Morimoto, Richard
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee  
Name of key/compensated personRichard I MorimotoRichard I MorimotoRichard Morimoto  
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue  
Average hours per week working for org0.500.500.10  
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00  
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00  
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00  
Moriwaki, Gary
Title  Trustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated person  Gary S Moriwaki Gary S Moriwaki Esq
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director  True True
Average hours per week working for org  0.00 1.00
Reportable compensation from org  $0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs  $0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs   $0.00 $0.00
Onuma, Susan
Title    Trustee
Name of key/compensated person    Susan J Onuma Esq
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director    True
Average hours per week working for org    2.00
Reportable compensation from org    $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs    $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs     $0.00
Oshima, Miyoko
Title    COO/CFO (Resigned 5-10-12)
Name of key/compensated person    Miyoko Oshima
Position of compensated person
Average hours per week working for org    40.00
Reportable compensation from org    $40,381.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs    $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs     $0.00
Shiba, Wendy
TitleVice-ChairVice-ChairVice-Chair Vice-Chair
Name of key/compensated personWendy C ShibaWendy C ShibaWendy C Shiba Esq Wendy C Shiba Esq
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org1.941.942.10 2.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Takei, George
TitleChairman EmeritusChairman EmeritusChairman Emeritus Chairman Emeritus
Name of key/compensated personGeorge H TakeiGeorge H TakeiGeorge H Takei George H Takei
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org0.460.460.40 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Watanabe, Guy
Title    Trustee
Name of key/compensated person    Guy Watanabe
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or director    True
Average hours per week working for org    1.00
Reportable compensation from org    $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs    $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs     $0.00
Wheaton, Rena
TitleSecretarySecretarySecretary Secretary
Name of key/compensated personRena Miwako WheatonRena Miwako WheatonRena Miwako Wheaton Esq Rena Miwako Wheaton Esq
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org0.880.880.90 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Yamagata, Harvey
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee Trustee
Name of key/compensated personHarvey H YamagataHarvey H YamagataHarvey H Yamagata Harvey H Yamagata
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org1.281.281.40 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Yamate, Gordon
TitleTrusteeTrusteeChair Chair
Name of key/compensated personGordon T YamateGordon T YamateGordon T Yamate Esq Gordon T Yamate Esq
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org1.411.415.80 2.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Yuki, Thomas
TitleTreasurerTreasurerTreasurer Treasurer
Name of key/compensated personThomas M YukiThomas M YukiThomas M Yuki Thomas M Yuki
Position of compensated person
Current individual trustee or directorTrueTrueTrue True
Average hours per week working for org1.181.180.90 1.00
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Purpose: mission, activities, & accomplishments
Mission or significant activitiesThe mission of the Japanese American National Museum is to promote understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience.The mission of the Japanese American National Museum is to promote understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience.The mission of the Japanese American National Museum is to promote understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience. The mission of the Japanese American National Museum is to promote understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience.
Program service expenses, total$4,592,119.00$4,631,288.00$4,894,807.00 $3,606,175.00
Programs, including revenue & expenses
CollectionsPioneering actor and passionate civil rights activist George Takei, along with husband Brad Takei, donated his personal collection, representing the many facets of his life and career, to the museum in September 2016. The George and Brad Takei Collection features a wide range of two- and three-dimensional artifacts that demonstrate the magnitude and breadth of Takei's accomplishments. The collection served as the foundation of the 2017 exhibition, New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei.Utilizing a total of more than $115,000 from two National Park Service Japanese American Confinement Sites grants for 2016, the Japanese American National Museum (JANM) began conservation work last fall on the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection of art and artifacts, and also began digitization of the Gihachi and Tsugio Yamashita Collection for an interactive website that chronicles one family's journeys during World War II.In addition to these publicly announced developments, the Collections Management and Access Unit kept busy with a variety of projects, which during this fiscal year included: completing the Collections Management Policy, Collections Plan, and other documents pertaining to the reaccreditation process; completing an assessment of onsite collections as part of the AAM reaccreditation process; working on a conservation survey of the extensive Henry Sugimoto Collection; processing the Mine Okubo papers; and creating finding aids for the Buddhist Churches of America records. Regular, ongoing responsibilities of the department include handling, processing, installing, labeling, and de-installing incoming art and artifacts for JANM's temporary exhibitions; requesting loans of artifacts from other institutions; processing loans of JANM holdings to other institutions; handling requests from researchers, filmmakers, and publishers for access to JANM's archives; handling image licensing requests; digitizing numerous items from the collection for online access; and reviewing proposed donations to the collection, among other duties.ExhibitionsTatau: Marks of PolynesiaJuly 30, 2016-January 8, 2017Tatau: Marks of Polynesia explored Samoan tattoo practice through photographs that showcased the work of traditional tatau masters alongside more contemporary manifestations of the art form. Curated by author and master tattoo artist Takahiro "Ryudaibori" Kitamura with photography by John Agcaoili, Tatau highlighted the beauty of the Samoan tattoo tradition as well as its key role in the preservation and propagation of Samoan culture. Through exhibitions like Tatau, JANM continues its work of promoting understanding of diverse cultures.The Artistry of Kubo: A Magical LAIKA Experience August 13-30, 2016TEMPORARY DISPLAY IN ARATANI CENTRAL HALLLAIKA, the award-winning animation studio whose movie, Kubo and the Two Strings, opened on August 19, 2016, presented The Artistry of Kubo: A Magical LAIKA Experience in JANM's Aratani Central Hall. Visitors got a behind-the-scenes interactive peek at Kubo and the Two Strings through puppets, sets, props, monsters, origami, and costumes from the production.Uprooted: Japanese American Farm Labor Camps During World War IISeptember 27, 2016-January 8, 2017Between 1942 and 1944, thousands of incarcerated Japanese Americans were moved from concentration camps to farm labor camps as a way to mitigate the wartime labor shortage. In the summer of 1942, Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographer Russell Lee documented four such camps in Oregon and Idaho, capturing the laborers' day-to-day lives in evocative detail. Uprooted: Japanese American Farm Labor Camps During World War II presented a selection of those images, many of which have never before been exhibited. SPECIAL DISPLAYSebastian Masuda's Time After Time CapsuleNovember 1, 2016-January 29, 2017Time After Time Capsule is a traveling art project that invites people around the world to contribute cherished personal items to fill 10 nine-foot-tall, translucent Hello Kitty time capsule sculptures. At each stop on the capsules' tour, the local community is invited to contribute colorfully decorated items of personal value to one of the time capsules. All 10 of these sculptures will later be gathered in Tokyo to mark the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, and fashioned into a monumental art piece for public viewing. In 2035, each sculpture will be returned to the cities where they were filled, and project participants will be able to reunite with the personal items they contributed years before. SPECIAL DISPLAYOnly the Oaks Remain: The Story of Tuna Canyon Detention StationDecember 10, 2016-April 9, 2017This special display told the true stories of those targeted as dangerous enemy aliens and imprisoned in the Tuna Canyon Detention Station, located in the Tujunga neighborhood of Los Angeles, by the US Department of Justice during World War II. Rare artifacts such as photographs, letters, and diaries brought the experiences of imprisoned Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants and Japanese Peruvians to life.Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066February 18-August 13, 2017Presented in conjunction with the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, which paved the way for the World War II incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans, Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066 was an educational and interactive exhibition designed to engage visitors in critical discussions of the Japanese American incarceration experience and its continuing relevance today. Original documents, contemporary artworks, and documentary videos formed the substance of the exhibition; included were two pages of the original Executive Order 9066, on loan from the National Archives.New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George TakeiMarch 12-August 20, 2017New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei explored the life and career of pioneering actor, activist, and social media icon George Takei. By examining Takei's diverse experiences and achievements, this entertaining and interactive exhibition created a portrait of a unique individual while offering an innovative means of engaging with the social history of America. New Frontiers was curated by noted author, journalist, and cultural critic Jeff Yang.JANM-organized exhibitions continued to travel to venues around the world during FY17, representing a significant source of revenue for the museum. These included Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World, which traveled to Middlebury, Vermont; Sydney and Newcastle, Australia; and Christchurch, New Zealand; and Before They Were Heroes: Sus Ito's World War II Images, which traveled to Boston, Massachusetts.Public ProgramsIn FY17, JANM offered 140 public programs that served a total of 20,715 people. These included family festivals, craft workshops, talks, panel discussions, book readings, film screenings, walking tours, concerts, and a variety of other activities. Several of these events were community partnerships and collaborations with such entities as Visual Communications, Collaboration, Nikkei Genealogical Society, East West Players, Los Angeles International Tea Festival, Go For Broke National Education Center, Little Tokyo Historical Society, and Asian American Journalists Association, among others. Particularly popular programs included JANM Summer Night Concerts, Natsumatusuri Family Festival, Oshogatsu Family Festival, Tatau Opening Day Celebration, Day of Remembrance, Okaeri 2016: A Nikkei LGBTQ Gathering, Comedy InvAsian, Memories of Five Nisei, K-Town Reporters Community Screening Event, Reconstructing Memories: An Art Workshop with Mike Saijo, Nick Ut: Beyond Napalm Girl, and the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival. All of these programs were near or beyond capacity.
Program expenses$2,631,906.00    
Program revenue$267,947.00    
Program descriptionCollectionsPioneering actor and passionate civil rights activist George Takei, along with husband Brad Takei, donated his personal collection, representing the many facets of his life and career, to the museum in September 2016. The George and Brad Takei Collection features a wide range of two- and three-dimensional artifacts that demonstrate the magnitude and breadth of Takei's accomplishments. The collection served as the foundation of the 2017 exhibition, New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei.Utilizing a total of more than $115,000 from two National Park Service Japanese American Confinement Sites grants for 2016, the Japanese American National Museum (JANM) began conservation work last fall on the Allen Hendershott Eaton Collection of art and artifacts, and also began digitization of the Gihachi and Tsugio Yamashita Collection for an interactive website that chronicles one family's journeys during World War II.In addition to these publicly announced developments, the Collections Management and Access Unit kept busy with a variety of projects, which during this fiscal year included: completing the Collections Management Policy, Collections Plan, and other documents pertaining to the reaccreditation process; completing an assessment of onsite collections as part of the AAM reaccreditation process; working on a conservation survey of the extensive Henry Sugimoto Collection; processing the Mine Okubo papers; and creating finding aids for the Buddhist Churches of America records. Regular, ongoing responsibilities of the department include handling, processing, installing, labeling, and de-installing incoming art and artifacts for JANM's temporary exhibitions; requesting loans of artifacts from other institutions; processing loans of JANM holdings to other institutions; handling requests from researchers, filmmakers, and publishers for access to JANM's archives; handling image licensing requests; digitizing numerous items from the collection for online access; and reviewing proposed donations to the collection, among other duties.ExhibitionsTatau: Marks of PolynesiaJuly 30, 2016-January 8, 2017Tatau: Marks of Polynesia explored Samoan tattoo practice through photographs that showcased the work of traditional tatau masters alongside more contemporary manifestations of the art form. Curated by author and master tattoo artist Takahiro "Ryudaibori" Kitamura with photography by John Agcaoili, Tatau highlighted the beauty of the Samoan tattoo tradition as well as its key role in the preservation and propagation of Samoan culture. Through exhibitions like Tatau, JANM continues its work of promoting understanding of diverse cultures.The Artistry of Kubo: A Magical LAIKA Experience August 13-30, 2016TEMPORARY DISPLAY IN ARATANI CENTRAL HALLLAIKA, the award-winning animation studio whose movie, Kubo and the Two Strings, opened on August 19, 2016, presented The Artistry of Kubo: A Magical LAIKA Experience in JANM's Aratani Central Hall. Visitors got a behind-the-scenes interactive peek at Kubo and the Two Strings through puppets, sets, props, monsters, origami, and costumes from the production.Uprooted: Japanese American Farm Labor Camps During World War IISeptember 27, 2016-January 8, 2017Between 1942 and 1944, thousands of incarcerated Japanese Americans were moved from concentration camps to farm labor camps as a way to mitigate the wartime labor shortage. In the summer of 1942, Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographer Russell Lee documented four such camps in Oregon and Idaho, capturing the laborers' day-to-day lives in evocative detail. Uprooted: Japanese American Farm Labor Camps During World War II presented a selection of those images, many of which have never before been exhibited. SPECIAL DISPLAYSebastian Masuda's Time After Time CapsuleNovember 1, 2016-January 29, 2017Time After Time Capsule is a traveling art project that invites people around the world to contribute cherished personal items to fill 10 nine-foot-tall, translucent Hello Kitty time capsule sculptures. At each stop on the capsules' tour, the local community is invited to contribute colorfully decorated items of personal value to one of the time capsules. All 10 of these sculptures will later be gathered in Tokyo to mark the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, and fashioned into a monumental art piece for public viewing. In 2035, each sculpture will be returned to the cities where they were filled, and project participants will be able to reunite with the personal items they contributed years before. SPECIAL DISPLAYOnly the Oaks Remain: The Story of Tuna Canyon Detention StationDecember 10, 2016-April 9, 2017This special display told the true stories of those targeted as dangerous enemy aliens and imprisoned in the Tuna Canyon Detention Station, located in the Tujunga neighborhood of Los Angeles, by the US Department of Justice during World War II. Rare artifacts such as photographs, letters, and diaries brought the experiences of imprisoned Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants and Japanese Peruvians to life.Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066February 18-August 13, 2017Presented in conjunction with the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, which paved the way for the World War II incarceration of 120,000 Japanese Americans, Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066 was an educational and interactive exhibition designed to engage visitors in critical discussions of the Japanese American incarceration experience and its continuing relevance today. Original documents, contemporary artworks, and documentary videos formed the substance of the exhibition; included were two pages of the original Executive Order 9066, on loan from the National Archives.New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George TakeiMarch 12-August 20, 2017New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei explored the life and career of pioneering actor, activist, and social media icon George Takei. By examining Takei's diverse experiences and achievements, this entertaining and interactive exhibition created a portrait of a unique individual while offering an innovative means of engaging with the social history of America. New Frontiers was curated by noted author, journalist, and cultural critic Jeff Yang.JANM-organized exhibitions continued to travel to venues around the world during FY17, representing a significant source of revenue for the museum. These included Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World, which traveled to Middlebury, Vermont; Sydney and Newcastle, Australia; and Christchurch, New Zealand; and Before They Were Heroes: Sus Ito's World War II Images, which traveled to Boston, Massachusetts.Public ProgramsIn FY17, JANM offered 140 public programs that served a total of 20,715 people. These included family festivals, craft workshops, talks, panel discussions, book readings, film screenings, walking tours, concerts, and a variety of other activities. Several of these events were community partnerships and collaborations with such entities as Visual Communications, Collaboration, Nikkei Genealogical Society, East West Players, Los Angeles International Tea Festival, Go For Broke National Education Center, Little Tokyo Historical Society, and Asian American Journalists Association, among others. Particularly popular programs included JANM Summer Night Concerts, Natsumatusuri Family Festival, Oshogatsu Family Festival, Tatau Opening Day Celebration, Day of Remembrance, Okaeri 2016: A Nikkei LGBTQ Gathering, Comedy InvAsian, Memories of Five Nisei, K-Town Reporters Community Screening Event, Reconstructing Memories: An Art Workshop with Mike Saijo, Nick Ut: Beyond Napalm Girl, and the Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival. All of these programs were near or beyond capacity.    
Education and Visitor Engagement-FY16Total attendance at the National Museum was 100,943. Of this number, 43,697 were museum walk-ins. The School Visits Program welcomed 15,617 students and teachers, who participated in educational programming held in the museum's main building and the adjoining National Center for the Preservation of Democracy.The Manabi and Sumi Hirasaki National Resource Center (HNRC) was established to provide the public-including scholars, researchers, writers, filmmakers, students, and family historians-with a means of accessing the museum's vast collection of information and resources both in-person and online. In FY16, the HNRC served 4,350 patrons, who requested access to War Relocation Authority records (416), Final Accountability Rosters (368), Department of Justice records (31), immigration records (137), military records (35), and a host of published secondary materials.This year, the National Museum's Education Unit was honored to partner with the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History to present the National Youth Summit on Japanese American Incarceration. On May 17, 2016, 150 high school students came to the Tateuchi Democracy Forum for a program that was simultaneously webcast live to over 3,600 students from 39 states and 3 countries. A panel discussion moderated by David Ono of ABC7 News featured a dynamic range of knowledgeable speakers, including Karen Korematsu, Founder and Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute; educator and camp survivor William "Bill" Shishima; Lorraine Bannai, Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality at Seattle University School of Law; Hussam Ayloush, Executive Director of the Los Angeles office of the Council on American Islamic Relations; activist and Culver City High School student Mariko Fujimoto Rooks; educator and spoken word artist George "G" Masao Yamazawa, Jr.; and rapper and UC Santa Barbara student "Kamikaze" Kane Tenorio.Following the panel, students in the audience were asked: "What idea or message will you remember most from this program?" Their responses underscored the importance of programs that help youth make connections between historic and contemporary issues. Following is a selection of their answers:-"If you speak up about something you're passionate about, you can move mountains."-"Being a youth, we can have a say, and we can have an impact." -"To be aware of those (and their culture) around you and to always speak up and speak the whole truth." -"If we let discrimination happen it will happen again-if we let history repeat itself, it will."Earlier this year, the National Museum was awarded $15,000 from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Metro Art program to create temporary banners that will be displayed on fences during the construction phase of the Metro Regional Connector station located at the corner of 2nd Street and Hope Street, in the heart of downtown Los Angeles. In addition to helping to beautify the construction site, this project is designed to encourage local students to study about and become more actively involved in their neighborhoods while learning from professional artists. The Education Unit is working with students from Boyle Heights High School and artists Ako Castuera and Edwin Ushiro, both of whom have been featured in the National Museum's exhibitions. The artwork will be completed in the next fiscal year. The Education Unit continues to work on "A Collections-Based Guide for Digitally Exploring America's Concentration Camps," funded by the National Park Service's Japanese American Confinement Sites (JACS) Grant Program. This project will now culminate in fall 2017 with the creation of a website that will help teachers and students learn more about the 10 Japanese American World War II War Relocation Authority sites. Like many museum education departments around the nation, the National Museum has been addressing changing volunteer demographics. The museum's education programs, especially, have relied on the volunteers' ability to share their personal World War II stories. Those volunteers are beginning to retire, however, and new volunteers are too young to remember World War II. To provide an alternative, the Education Unit has been developing new, Common Core State Standards-aligned tours that encourage students to closely examine and reflect upon exhibition artifacts. Docent-led tours are now supplemented by facilitated activities that employ the museum field's latest research about teaching and learning with artifacts. The National Museum's Director of Education met individually with many of the volunteers to discuss these developments. These informative meetings underscored how truly committed the volunteers are to the National Musuem's mission; for their part, the volunteers now better understand the important roles they continue to play at the museum.
Program expenses $1,545,889.00   
Program description Education and Visitor Engagement-FY16Total attendance at the National Museum was 100,943. Of this number, 43,697 were museum walk-ins. The School Visits Program welcomed 15,617 students and teachers, who participated in educational programming held in the museum's main building and the adjoining National Center for the Preservation of Democracy.The Manabi and Sumi Hirasaki National Resource Center (HNRC) was established to provide the public-including scholars, researchers, writers, filmmakers, students, and family historians-with a means of accessing the museum's vast collection of information and resources both in-person and online. In FY16, the HNRC served 4,350 patrons, who requested access to War Relocation Authority records (416), Final Accountability Rosters (368), Department of Justice records (31), immigration records (137), military records (35), and a host of published secondary materials.This year, the National Museum's Education Unit was honored to partner with the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History to present the National Youth Summit on Japanese American Incarceration. On May 17, 2016, 150 high school students came to the Tateuchi Democracy Forum for a program that was simultaneously webcast live to over 3,600 students from 39 states and 3 countries. A panel discussion moderated by David Ono of ABC7 News featured a dynamic range of knowledgeable speakers, including Karen Korematsu, Founder and Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute; educator and camp survivor William "Bill" Shishima; Lorraine Bannai, Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality at Seattle University School of Law; Hussam Ayloush, Executive Director of the Los Angeles office of the Council on American Islamic Relations; activist and Culver City High School student Mariko Fujimoto Rooks; educator and spoken word artist George "G" Masao Yamazawa, Jr.; and rapper and UC Santa Barbara student "Kamikaze" Kane Tenorio.Following the panel, students in the audience were asked: "What idea or message will you remember most from this program?" Their responses underscored the importance of programs that help youth make connections between historic and contemporary issues. Following is a selection of their answers:-"If you speak up about something you're passionate about, you can move mountains."-"Being a youth, we can have a say, and we can have an impact." -"To be aware of those (and their culture) around you and to always speak up and speak the whole truth." -"If we let discrimination happen it will happen again-if we let history repeat itself, it will."Earlier this year, the National Museum was awarded $15,000 from the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Metro Art program to create temporary banners that will be displayed on fences during the construction phase of the Metro Regional Connector station located at the corner of 2nd Street and Hope Street, in the heart of downtown Los Angeles. In addition to helping to beautify the construction site, this project is designed to encourage local students to study about and become more actively involved in their neighborhoods while learning from professional artists. The Education Unit is working with students from Boyle Heights High School and artists Ako Castuera and Edwin Ushiro, both of whom have been featured in the National Museum's exhibitions. The artwork will be completed in the next fiscal year. The Education Unit continues to work on "A Collections-Based Guide for Digitally Exploring America's Concentration Camps," funded by the National Park Service's Japanese American Confinement Sites (JACS) Grant Program. This project will now culminate in fall 2017 with the creation of a website that will help teachers and students learn more about the 10 Japanese American World War II War Relocation Authority sites. Like many museum education departments around the nation, the National Museum has been addressing changing volunteer demographics. The museum's education programs, especially, have relied on the volunteers' ability to share their personal World War II stories. Those volunteers are beginning to retire, however, and new volunteers are too young to remember World War II. To provide an alternative, the Education Unit has been developing new, Common Core State Standards-aligned tours that encourage students to closely examine and reflect upon exhibition artifacts. Docent-led tours are now supplemented by facilitated activities that employ the museum field's latest research about teaching and learning with artifacts. The National Museum's Director of Education met individually with many of the volunteers to discuss these developments. These informative meetings underscored how truly committed the volunteers are to the National Musuem's mission; for their part, the volunteers now better understand the important roles they continue to play at the museum.   
Education and Visitor EngagementIn FY17, total attendance at JANM was 105,022. Of this number, 35,845 were museum walk-ins. The School Visits Program welcomed 20,962 students and teachers, who participated in educational programming held in the museum's main building and the adjoining National Center for the Preservation of Democracy.As a response to recent public policy initiatives that pose potential threats to immigrant communities, the museum's first "Teach-In" took place on December 8, 2016. We invited three speakers to share their perspectives. JANM volunteer Mas Yamashita spoke about being incarcerated as a child during World War II in Topaz, Utah; Betty Hung of Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Los Angeles provided an overview of the political climate; and Mary Hendra of Facing History and Ourselves shared ideas for encouraging dialogue between students and teachers. What emerged was a shared understanding that teachers, school administrators, and community organizations like JANM must combine our efforts to ensure that our students feel safe. Later that same month, Allyson Nakamoto, Director of Education, and Lynn Yamasaki, School Programs Developer, joined five members of JANM's Board of Trustees and Board of Governors to attend the White House's program, "Generational Experiences of AAPI and Muslim, Arab, Sikh, and South Asian (MASSA) Communities." The White House staff modeled this program in part after the successful National Youth Summit that the Education Unit co-hosted with the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in May 2016. The program featured high school and college students from around the country who are working to positively impact their communities. We left inspired and even more grateful to educators who bring their students to visit JANM in order to learn from the past and become leaders who can stand up against hatred and discrimination.In January 2017, the Education Unit facilitated a four-week series of public conversations that took place within Common Ground: The Heart of Community and were centered on the themes of compassion, transparency, speaking out, and solidarity. Each conversation generated meaningful dialogue among guests, utilizing Japanese American history and the artifacts on display in the exhibition to delve into contemporary issues and concerns. We were energized to hear visitors' thoughts on these themes and their relevance to their own lives and to contemporary events.Building on the post-election Teach-In and JANM's Instructions to All Persons exhibition, we hosted a Teacher Workshop for Los Angeles-area K-12 teachers in March. This event reached its maximum capacity of 25 teachers just 1 weeks after registration opened. The teachers explored Instructions to All Persons and learned about the Japanese American, Arab American, Latinx, and Mixed Race experiences. Special guest Isra el-Bashir, Curator of Education and Public Programming at the Arab American National Museum, facilitated a dialogue on citizenship and belonging. At the end of the workshop, one teacher commented:JANM consistently does a wonderful job making the story of the Japanese internment come to life... In these divisive times, it is more important than ever for museums like JANM to continue sharing history with communities.Media ArtsThe Frank H. Watase Media Arts Center (MAC) continued to provide JANM with a comprehensive program of digital media production and presentation; documentation and preservation; and education and training. Productions during FY17 included an introductory video for the exhibition Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066 that included poignant excerpts from video coverage of the 1981 Los Angeles Hearings of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. To promote the exhibition and the Community Day of Remembrance, Akira Boch and Evan Kodani of MAC staff created short videos posted on Facebook by Team Takei, George Takei's social media consultants. These two videos have logged more than 1.2 million views since posting in February. MAC staff also created three videos for the exhibition New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei, presenting highlights of the life and career of the actor, activist and social media icon.For the past two years, JANM's exhibition staff has researched and developed Transpacific Borderlands: The Art of Japanese Diaspora in Lima, Los Angeles, Mexico City and S o Paulo, an exhibition that is part of the Getty Foundation's regional Pacific Standard Time Project. Preparation included extensive video interviews of participating artists by curators working with JANM's media arts center. During the exhibition, video clips of these artists will be made accessible on the museum's Discover Nikkei website and YouTube Channel.Staff also added five major life history interviews to the museum archive of first person narratives about the Japanese American experience. The team is presently processing these interviews for uploading in the upcoming year: Frank H. Watase, 93 (for whom JANM's Watase Media Arts Center is named); Frank Seiyu Higashi, 98; Jim Matsuoka, 82; and James "Jim" Makoto Tajiri, 91. MAC staff also recorded a conversation with founding members of the Montebello Womens Club: Sakaye Aratani, Linda Fujioka, Yae Aihara and Elsie Uyematsu Osajima. The Media Arts Center collaborated with June Aochi Berk and Kanji Sahara of the Tuna Canyon Detention Station Coalition to videotape life histories of descendants of those interned at the Station by the U.S. government during World War II. Selected clips of these interviews were included in Only The Oaks Remain: The Tuna Canyon Detention Traveling Exhibition. MAC staff also worked on interviews with Mimi Sasaki, Tohru Isobe, sisters Francis Kuraoka and Grace Hatchimonji, Bacon Sakatani, Shinya Honda, and James Iso. In addition, Media Arts Specialist Akira Boch conducted interviews in Japanese with Paulo Issamu Hirano and Antonio Shinkiti Shikota during a visit to Tokyo.MAC staff was also responsible for licensing of JANM's Moving Image Collection and negotiated a major licensing agreement with Tule Lake Documentary Project. (Through a partnership agreement, JANM's original films are stored at the Academy Film Archive of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; Lynne Kirste, Special Collections Curator, provides invaluable assistance in monitoring digitization of home movies, ensuring that the digitized files meet the Academy's rigorous preservation standards.) As in past years, MAC worked with the Getty Multicultural Undergraduate Internship Program to mentor and instruct a student during the summer months. For 10 weeks, Karina Kawana, a digital media major at the University of Southern California, worked closely with MAC on a variety of projects and made significant creative contributions to JANM's media presentations.MAC staff worked with Public Programs Coordinator, Elizabeth Lim, to record, process and archive programs and events for future use in marketing, Gala program, Discover Nikkei content and member services. Documentation included Family Free Days, panel discussions, author book signings and lectures, screenings, curator tours of exhibitions, performances, and special events such as the Oshogatsu Family Festival and the Natsumatsuri. Excerpts were included in special compilation videos produced for JANM's annual gala fundraiser in May 2017, and selected programs were made accessible by the public through the museum's YouTube Channel, janmdotorg.Discover NikkeiJANM's Discover Nikkei project is a major online resource that brings together the voices and experiences of Nikkei (Japanese emigrants and their descendants) who have created communities throughout the world. The multilingual website-available in English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese-documents Nikkei history and culture and provides learning and networking tools for Nikkei around the world. After 11 years in operation, Discover Nikkei currently hosts more than 2,500 stories from over 750 writers worldwide; more than 1,300 video clips from nearly 200 interviews discussing experiences in the United States, Canada, Japan, Peru, Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Chile; and over 350 Nikkei Albums.During FY17, Discover Nikkei recorded 431,914 visitors (541,267 sessions), a dramatic increase from the previous year (334,043 visitors with 414,842 sessions). This increase was due to several very popular articles in the Journal section. The top five countries of visitors were the United States, Japan, Mexico, Peru, and Brazil. In this reporting period, the team focused specifically on the development of the Journal and Interview sections that have been our most effective program components in successfully sharing the diverse, global experiences of Nikkei individuals and communities.
Program expenses$1,642,958.00    
Program descriptionEducation and Visitor EngagementIn FY17, total attendance at JANM was 105,022. Of this number, 35,845 were museum walk-ins. The School Visits Program welcomed 20,962 students and teachers, who participated in educational programming held in the museum's main building and the adjoining National Center for the Preservation of Democracy.As a response to recent public policy initiatives that pose potential threats to immigrant communities, the museum's first "Teach-In" took place on December 8, 2016. We invited three speakers to share their perspectives. JANM volunteer Mas Yamashita spoke about being incarcerated as a child during World War II in Topaz, Utah; Betty Hung of Asian Americans Advancing Justice-Los Angeles provided an overview of the political climate; and Mary Hendra of Facing History and Ourselves shared ideas for encouraging dialogue between students and teachers. What emerged was a shared understanding that teachers, school administrators, and community organizations like JANM must combine our efforts to ensure that our students feel safe. Later that same month, Allyson Nakamoto, Director of Education, and Lynn Yamasaki, School Programs Developer, joined five members of JANM's Board of Trustees and Board of Governors to attend the White House's program, "Generational Experiences of AAPI and Muslim, Arab, Sikh, and South Asian (MASSA) Communities." The White House staff modeled this program in part after the successful National Youth Summit that the Education Unit co-hosted with the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in May 2016. The program featured high school and college students from around the country who are working to positively impact their communities. We left inspired and even more grateful to educators who bring their students to visit JANM in order to learn from the past and become leaders who can stand up against hatred and discrimination.In January 2017, the Education Unit facilitated a four-week series of public conversations that took place within Common Ground: The Heart of Community and were centered on the themes of compassion, transparency, speaking out, and solidarity. Each conversation generated meaningful dialogue among guests, utilizing Japanese American history and the artifacts on display in the exhibition to delve into contemporary issues and concerns. We were energized to hear visitors' thoughts on these themes and their relevance to their own lives and to contemporary events.Building on the post-election Teach-In and JANM's Instructions to All Persons exhibition, we hosted a Teacher Workshop for Los Angeles-area K-12 teachers in March. This event reached its maximum capacity of 25 teachers just 1 weeks after registration opened. The teachers explored Instructions to All Persons and learned about the Japanese American, Arab American, Latinx, and Mixed Race experiences. Special guest Isra el-Bashir, Curator of Education and Public Programming at the Arab American National Museum, facilitated a dialogue on citizenship and belonging. At the end of the workshop, one teacher commented:JANM consistently does a wonderful job making the story of the Japanese internment come to life... In these divisive times, it is more important than ever for museums like JANM to continue sharing history with communities.Media ArtsThe Frank H. Watase Media Arts Center (MAC) continued to provide JANM with a comprehensive program of digital media production and presentation; documentation and preservation; and education and training. Productions during FY17 included an introductory video for the exhibition Instructions to All Persons: Reflections on Executive Order 9066 that included poignant excerpts from video coverage of the 1981 Los Angeles Hearings of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. To promote the exhibition and the Community Day of Remembrance, Akira Boch and Evan Kodani of MAC staff created short videos posted on Facebook by Team Takei, George Takei's social media consultants. These two videos have logged more than 1.2 million views since posting in February. MAC staff also created three videos for the exhibition New Frontiers: The Many Worlds of George Takei, presenting highlights of the life and career of the actor, activist and social media icon.For the past two years, JANM's exhibition staff has researched and developed Transpacific Borderlands: The Art of Japanese Diaspora in Lima, Los Angeles, Mexico City and S o Paulo, an exhibition that is part of the Getty Foundation's regional Pacific Standard Time Project. Preparation included extensive video interviews of participating artists by curators working with JANM's media arts center. During the exhibition, video clips of these artists will be made accessible on the museum's Discover Nikkei website and YouTube Channel.Staff also added five major life history interviews to the museum archive of first person narratives about the Japanese American experience. The team is presently processing these interviews for uploading in the upcoming year: Frank H. Watase, 93 (for whom JANM's Watase Media Arts Center is named); Frank Seiyu Higashi, 98; Jim Matsuoka, 82; and James "Jim" Makoto Tajiri, 91. MAC staff also recorded a conversation with founding members of the Montebello Womens Club: Sakaye Aratani, Linda Fujioka, Yae Aihara and Elsie Uyematsu Osajima. The Media Arts Center collaborated with June Aochi Berk and Kanji Sahara of the Tuna Canyon Detention Station Coalition to videotape life histories of descendants of those interned at the Station by the U.S. government during World War II. Selected clips of these interviews were included in Only The Oaks Remain: The Tuna Canyon Detention Traveling Exhibition. MAC staff also worked on interviews with Mimi Sasaki, Tohru Isobe, sisters Francis Kuraoka and Grace Hatchimonji, Bacon Sakatani, Shinya Honda, and James Iso. In addition, Media Arts Specialist Akira Boch conducted interviews in Japanese with Paulo Issamu Hirano and Antonio Shinkiti Shikota during a visit to Tokyo.MAC staff was also responsible for licensing of JANM's Moving Image Collection and negotiated a major licensing agreement with Tule Lake Documentary Project. (Through a partnership agreement, JANM's original films are stored at the Academy Film Archive of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; Lynne Kirste, Special Collections Curator, provides invaluable assistance in monitoring digitization of home movies, ensuring that the digitized files meet the Academy's rigorous preservation standards.) As in past years, MAC worked with the Getty Multicultural Undergraduate Internship Program to mentor and instruct a student during the summer months. For 10 weeks, Karina Kawana, a digital media major at the University of Southern California, worked closely with MAC on a variety of projects and made significant creative contributions to JANM's media presentations.MAC staff worked with Public Programs Coordinator, Elizabeth Lim, to record, process and archive programs and events for future use in marketing, Gala program, Discover Nikkei content and member services. Documentation included Family Free Days, panel discussions, author book signings and lectures, screenings, curator tours of exhibitions, performances, and special events such as the Oshogatsu Family Festival and the Natsumatsuri. Excerpts were included in special compilation videos produced for JANM's annual gala fundraiser in May 2017, and selected programs were made accessible by the public through the museum's YouTube Channel, janmdotorg.Discover NikkeiJANM's Discover Nikkei project is a major online resource that brings together the voices and experiences of Nikkei (Japanese emigrants and their descendants) who have created communities throughout the world. The multilingual website-available in English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese-documents Nikkei history and culture and provides learning and networking tools for Nikkei around the world. After 11 years in operation, Discover Nikkei currently hosts more than 2,500 stories from over 750 writers worldwide; more than 1,300 video clips from nearly 200 interviews discussing experiences in the United States, Canada, Japan, Peru, Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Chile; and over 350 Nikkei Albums.During FY17, Discover Nikkei recorded 431,914 visitors (541,267 sessions), a dramatic increase from the previous year (334,043 visitors with 414,842 sessions). This increase was due to several very popular articles in the Journal section. The top five countries of visitors were the United States, Japan, Mexico, Peru, and Brazil. In this reporting period, the team focused specifically on the development of the Journal and Interview sections that have been our most effective program components in successfully sharing the diverse, global experiences of Nikkei individuals and communities.    
Education-For FY13, total onsite visitation totaled 79,023 and included 41,109 walk-in visitors. The School Visits Program engaged 10,663 students and teachers who participated in educational programming at the Museum or our National Center for the Preservation of Democracy. Starting with the 2012-2013 school year, visits were primarily booked online. Additional changes included greater focus on new activities such as object analysis with the Museum's education collection, designed to complement a guided tour of Common Ground: The Heart of Community.Additional educational programming highlights included: -- The launch of the Girl Scout Badge Program (Summer 2012), a revenue-generating complement to the exhibition Folding Paper: The Infinite Possibilities of Origami;-- Giant Robot Entourage workshops for high school students (Winter 2013), held in conjunction with the Giant Robot Biennale 3 exhibition in order to spark dialogue and connections between students and professional artists;-- Participation in the Smithsonian Institution's Immigration/Migration Initiative Pilot (Spring 2013), through which we engaged a 9th grade Honors English class in a project to examine family artifacts and share narratives about their own 'American journeys';-- Educator workshops (throughout the year), with 242 teachers from 4 school districts attending workshops at the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy; and -- Production of Guide-By-Cell features (throughout the year) for the special exhibitions Giant Robot Biennale 3, Supernatural and Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter.The Education Department also oversaw the planning and final preparations for JANM's fourth National Conference, Speaking Up! Democracy, Justice, Dignity, held July 47, 2013, in Seattle, Washington.In order to provide high quality customer service to all JANM visitors, Christy Sakamoto was promoted to Visitor Experience Coordinator, with oversight of Visitor Services, Group Visits, and the Hirasaki National Resource Center (HNRC). The HNRC welcomed 4,274 visitors and provided access to War Relocation Authority (WRA), Final Accountability Roster (FAR), Department of Justice (DOJ), immigration and military experience records. In addition, the HNRC was the site for our display of American Heroes: Japanese American World War II Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal, on view from May 4 - June 9, 2013.
Program expenses    $1,252,136.00
Program description    Education-For FY13, total onsite visitation totaled 79,023 and included 41,109 walk-in visitors. The School Visits Program engaged 10,663 students and teachers who participated in educational programming at the Museum or our National Center for the Preservation of Democracy. Starting with the 2012-2013 school year, visits were primarily booked online. Additional changes included greater focus on new activities such as object analysis with the Museum's education collection, designed to complement a guided tour of Common Ground: The Heart of Community.Additional educational programming highlights included: -- The launch of the Girl Scout Badge Program (Summer 2012), a revenue-generating complement to the exhibition Folding Paper: The Infinite Possibilities of Origami;-- Giant Robot Entourage workshops for high school students (Winter 2013), held in conjunction with the Giant Robot Biennale 3 exhibition in order to spark dialogue and connections between students and professional artists;-- Participation in the Smithsonian Institution's Immigration/Migration Initiative Pilot (Spring 2013), through which we engaged a 9th grade Honors English class in a project to examine family artifacts and share narratives about their own 'American journeys';-- Educator workshops (throughout the year), with 242 teachers from 4 school districts attending workshops at the National Center for the Preservation of Democracy; and -- Production of Guide-By-Cell features (throughout the year) for the special exhibitions Giant Robot Biennale 3, Supernatural and Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter.The Education Department also oversaw the planning and final preparations for JANM's fourth National Conference, Speaking Up! Democracy, Justice, Dignity, held July 47, 2013, in Seattle, Washington.In order to provide high quality customer service to all JANM visitors, Christy Sakamoto was promoted to Visitor Experience Coordinator, with oversight of Visitor Services, Group Visits, and the Hirasaki National Resource Center (HNRC). The HNRC welcomed 4,274 visitors and provided access to War Relocation Authority (WRA), Final Accountability Roster (FAR), Department of Justice (DOJ), immigration and military experience records. In addition, the HNRC was the site for our display of American Heroes: Japanese American World War II Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal, on view from May 4 - June 9, 2013.
Education-In FY15, attendance at the National Museum totaled 178,779. Of this number, 25,513 were museum walk-ins. The School Visits Program welcomed 17,313 students and teachers, who participated in educational programming held in the National Museum's main building and the adjoining National Center for the Preservation of Democracy. Additional educational programming highlights included:-The National Museum hosted five Girl Scout Patch programs in conjunction with Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty. These programs served a total of 346 people.-The National Museum was a participant in the Los Angeles Summer of Learning, a city-wide initiative organized by the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Mayor's office. Joining the Getty, LACMA, Skirball Cultural Center, and other local libraries, parks, and museums, the National Museum offered a digital badge for students who attended the Natsumatsuri Family Festival on August 9, 2014. The National Museum then participated in a panel on the experience at the California Association of Museums conference in February 2015 in San Diego along with representatives from the Getty Museum, Ronald Reagan Library, and the Los Angeles Unified School District.-The San Joaquin County Office of Education, in partnership with the Fred T. Korematsu Institute, produced a series of workshops to train third- and fourth-generation Japanese Americans to share their families' experiences with California teachers. As an invited collaborator, the National Museum hosted a workshop for over 50 teachers on January 10, 2015 in partnership with the Los Angeles County Office of Education. In addition to the two National Museum docents who shared their families' stories with the teachers, the guest speaker was Karen Korematsu, the daughter of the late Fred T. Korematsu and Founder/Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute.-The National Museum's Education Unit is currently working on "A Collections-Based Guide for Digitally Exploring America's Concentration Camps," funded by the National Park Service. This project will culminate in Fall 2016 with the creation and digitization of a website that will help teachers and students learn more about the ten Japanese American World War II War Relocation Authority sites. In keeping with the schedule and budget proposed to the National Park Service, the project has thus far convened scholars, educators, and staff members from the National Museum's Collections Management and Access Unit, Marketing/Communications Department, and the Frank H. Watase Media Arts Center to collaboratively determine the website's architecture and content.
Program expenses  $735,623.00  
Program description  Education-In FY15, attendance at the National Museum totaled 178,779. Of this number, 25,513 were museum walk-ins. The School Visits Program welcomed 17,313 students and teachers, who participated in educational programming held in the National Museum's main building and the adjoining National Center for the Preservation of Democracy. Additional educational programming highlights included:-The National Museum hosted five Girl Scout Patch programs in conjunction with Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty. These programs served a total of 346 people.-The National Museum was a participant in the Los Angeles Summer of Learning, a city-wide initiative organized by the Los Angeles Unified School District and the Mayor's office. Joining the Getty, LACMA, Skirball Cultural Center, and other local libraries, parks, and museums, the National Museum offered a digital badge for students who attended the Natsumatsuri Family Festival on August 9, 2014. The National Museum then participated in a panel on the experience at the California Association of Museums conference in February 2015 in San Diego along with representatives from the Getty Museum, Ronald Reagan Library, and the Los Angeles Unified School District.-The San Joaquin County Office of Education, in partnership with the Fred T. Korematsu Institute, produced a series of workshops to train third- and fourth-generation Japanese Americans to share their families' experiences with California teachers. As an invited collaborator, the National Museum hosted a workshop for over 50 teachers on January 10, 2015 in partnership with the Los Angeles County Office of Education. In addition to the two National Museum docents who shared their families' stories with the teachers, the guest speaker was Karen Korematsu, the daughter of the late Fred T. Korematsu and Founder/Executive Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute.-The National Museum's Education Unit is currently working on "A Collections-Based Guide for Digitally Exploring America's Concentration Camps," funded by the National Park Service. This project will culminate in Fall 2016 with the creation and digitization of a website that will help teachers and students learn more about the ten Japanese American World War II War Relocation Authority sites. In keeping with the schedule and budget proposed to the National Park Service, the project has thus far convened scholars, educators, and staff members from the National Museum's Collections Management and Access Unit, Marketing/Communications Department, and the Frank H. Watase Media Arts Center to collaboratively determine the website's architecture and content.  
Exhibitions-FY15 was a highly focused period for the National Museum's exhibitions, in which the museum opened fewer shows but leveraged a great deal more impact out of them. After closing a suite of popular and acclaimed shows in September 2014 (Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World; Dodgers: Brotherhood of the Game; and Colors of Confinement: Rare Kodachrome Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II), the National Museum opened Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty, a blockbuster exhibition that examined the history of the iconic Sanrio character and her pervasive influence on contemporary culture. Hello! broke all previous attendance records, generated extensive worldwide media attention, and brought unprecedented numbers of new visitors to the museum. In anticipation of audience demand, Hello! remained on view for over seven months.The National Museum's ongoing core exhibition, Common Ground: The Heart of Community, has been enhanced with a new audio guide available in five languages: English, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, and Spanish. Thanks to the generous support of longtime National Museum supporter Nitto Tire U.S.A. Inc., all five versions of the guide have been loaded onto iPod Touches that are available for museum visitors to check out free of charge. The guides can also be downloaded for free through the Apple App Store, making them valuable resources even for people who are not physically at the National Museum, as they provide images, oral histories, and other rich content pertaining to the Japanese American experience.The National Museum continues to travel its exhibitions to other venues wherever possible, generating additional revenue and exposure for the National Museum. In FY15, Kip Fulbeck: part asian, 100% hapa traveled to the Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre while Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World traveled to the Asian Arts Gallery at Towson University and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.Media Arts: The Frank H. Watase Media Arts Center (MAC) continued to provide the National Museum with a comprehensive program of digital media production and presentation; documentation and preservation; and education and training. Productions during FY15 included exhibition videos for the major exhibition, Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty. Staff worked with Sanrio to produce Hello Kitty Sizzle Reel, a compilation curated from several hours of media coverage, and to create and install Hello Kitty On the Go, a video featuring a travel motif. MAC staff also completed and installed videos to accompany Before They Were Heroes: Sus Ito's World War II Images and Sugar/Islands: Finding Okinawa in Hawai'i. The videos include excerpts from interviews with the artists and documentation of the opening festivities and artist presentations.In July 2014, MAC's video production, A Day in the Life of Little Tokyo, was selected for inclusion in the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center's online exhibition, A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America. The video-which was one of only a few chosen for the exhibition out of a total of over 2,000 photo and video submissions-chronicles the museum's activities on May 10, 2014, which included a Target Free Family Day and the two exhibitions, Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World and Dodgers: Brotherhood of the Game.MAC produced six new life history videos for the Discover Nikkei website. The subjects included Frank Shoda, a 100-year-old Nisei who reminisced about Little Tokyo in the pre-WWII era, and 70-year-old Roger Minami, a Broadway dancer and Las Vegas entertainer. MAC also continued to document the National Museum's public programs and events, including Free Family Days, readings, lectures, panel discussions, performances, and special events such as Hello Kitty Con; highlights include short profile pieces in support of Dodgers: Brotherhood of the Game; a recording of a panel discussion that followed a 30-year anniversary screening of The Karate Kid; and a documentary on the making of Katie Yamasaki's Moon Beholders, a new mural commissioned by the National Museum. These videos have received thousands of views on YouTube.Licensing requests submitted to the National Museum's Moving Image Archive included family home movie clips for Bluewater Media's East L.A. Interchange Project, an independent documentary about L.A.'s Boyle Heights neighborhood.
Program expenses  $2,792,305.00  
Program revenue  $1,145,233.00  
Program description  Exhibitions-FY15 was a highly focused period for the National Museum's exhibitions, in which the museum opened fewer shows but leveraged a great deal more impact out of them. After closing a suite of popular and acclaimed shows in September 2014 (Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World; Dodgers: Brotherhood of the Game; and Colors of Confinement: Rare Kodachrome Photographs of Japanese American Incarceration in World War II), the National Museum opened Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty, a blockbuster exhibition that examined the history of the iconic Sanrio character and her pervasive influence on contemporary culture. Hello! broke all previous attendance records, generated extensive worldwide media attention, and brought unprecedented numbers of new visitors to the museum. In anticipation of audience demand, Hello! remained on view for over seven months.The National Museum's ongoing core exhibition, Common Ground: The Heart of Community, has been enhanced with a new audio guide available in five languages: English, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, and Spanish. Thanks to the generous support of longtime National Museum supporter Nitto Tire U.S.A. Inc., all five versions of the guide have been loaded onto iPod Touches that are available for museum visitors to check out free of charge. The guides can also be downloaded for free through the Apple App Store, making them valuable resources even for people who are not physically at the National Museum, as they provide images, oral histories, and other rich content pertaining to the Japanese American experience.The National Museum continues to travel its exhibitions to other venues wherever possible, generating additional revenue and exposure for the National Museum. In FY15, Kip Fulbeck: part asian, 100% hapa traveled to the Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre while Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World traveled to the Asian Arts Gallery at Towson University and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.Media Arts: The Frank H. Watase Media Arts Center (MAC) continued to provide the National Museum with a comprehensive program of digital media production and presentation; documentation and preservation; and education and training. Productions during FY15 included exhibition videos for the major exhibition, Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty. Staff worked with Sanrio to produce Hello Kitty Sizzle Reel, a compilation curated from several hours of media coverage, and to create and install Hello Kitty On the Go, a video featuring a travel motif. MAC staff also completed and installed videos to accompany Before They Were Heroes: Sus Ito's World War II Images and Sugar/Islands: Finding Okinawa in Hawai'i. The videos include excerpts from interviews with the artists and documentation of the opening festivities and artist presentations.In July 2014, MAC's video production, A Day in the Life of Little Tokyo, was selected for inclusion in the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center's online exhibition, A Day in the Life of Asian Pacific America. The video-which was one of only a few chosen for the exhibition out of a total of over 2,000 photo and video submissions-chronicles the museum's activities on May 10, 2014, which included a Target Free Family Day and the two exhibitions, Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World and Dodgers: Brotherhood of the Game.MAC produced six new life history videos for the Discover Nikkei website. The subjects included Frank Shoda, a 100-year-old Nisei who reminisced about Little Tokyo in the pre-WWII era, and 70-year-old Roger Minami, a Broadway dancer and Las Vegas entertainer. MAC also continued to document the National Museum's public programs and events, including Free Family Days, readings, lectures, panel discussions, performances, and special events such as Hello Kitty Con; highlights include short profile pieces in support of Dodgers: Brotherhood of the Game; a recording of a panel discussion that followed a 30-year anniversary screening of The Karate Kid; and a documentary on the making of Katie Yamasaki's Moon Beholders, a new mural commissioned by the National Museum. These videos have received thousands of views on YouTube.Licensing requests submitted to the National Museum's Moving Image Archive included family home movie clips for Bluewater Media's East L.A. Interchange Project, an independent documentary about L.A.'s Boyle Heights neighborhood.  
Exhibitions-FY16After the closing of the blockbuster exhibition Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty, which generated record-breaking crowds and worldwide media coverage for the museum, the National Museum continued to offer diverse exhibitions that engaged a variety of constituencies and furthered the museum's mission of promoting understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity.Sugar/Islands: Finding Okinawa in Hawai'i (July 11-September 6, 2015) was a unique examination of worker migration and settlement from the islands of Okinawa to the islands of Hawai'i, prompted by opportunities afforded by the latter's sugar plantations and pineapple farms during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The exhibition incorporated paintings by Laura Kina and photographs by Emily Hanako Momohara, both fourth-generation, mixed-heritage women with familial roots in Okinawa and Hawai'i. Sugar/Islands and its related public programs gave the National Museum an important opportunity to engage in substantive ways with the Okinawan community and build stronger relationships with them.Before They Were Heroes: Sus Ito's World War II Images (July 14-September 6, 2015) celebrated the donation by Susumu "Sus" Ito of his vast archive of photographs and negatives taken while on duty during World War II. The exhibition's selection of photographs-along with excerpts from Ito's life history video, recorded by the National Museum's Media Arts Center-gave the public a rare and breathtaking look at the daily lives of the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion of the celebrated all-Japanese American 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Before They Were Heroes was enormously popular; events featuring appearances by Ito sold out, and media outlets including the LA Times ran profiles and rave reviews. Recognizing Ito's accomplishments was also gratifying on a personal level for museum staff and many others, as Ito passed away shortly after the exhibition closed.Jidai: Timeless Works of Samurai Art (August 1-30, 2015) was a special display that looked at the weaponry and armor of the samurai-Japan's elite warrior class. Assembled from collections in the greater Los Angeles area, Jidai featured rare and historically significant samurai artifacts dating as far back as the Kamakura Period (AD 1185-1333) in Japan. The display also examined ways this facet of Japanese culture has been preserved, embraced, and shared in America. Timed to coincide with Nisei Week (Little Tokyo's annual weeklong Japanese Festival), Jidai was warmly received by visitors. Daily attendance was notably high, and talks with the two curators attracted capacity crowds.Giant Robot Biennale 4 (October 11, 2015-January 24, 2016) continued a collaboration with pop culture entrepreneur Eric Nakamura that began in 2007. Launched in 1994 as a hand-assembled zine, Giant Robot is now recognized as a highly influential store and brand that encompasses many aspects of pop art, skateboarder, comic book, graphic arts, and vinyl toy culture. GRB4 examined the evolution of the Giant Robot aesthetic from its humble origins to its many celebrated manifestations. The highly anticipated exhibition included a drawing showcase, live performances in the galleries, a miniature recreation of the store featuring iconic objects from its history, and an interactive replica of exhibiting artist Edwin Ushiro's studio.Two Views: Photographs by Ansel Adams and Leonard Frank (February 28-April 24, 2016), a traveling exhibition organized by the Nikkei National Museum, presented a compelling collection of documentary images by two renowned 20th-century photographers, who captured distinctive views of the Japanese American and Japanese Canadian incarcerations during World War II. The exhibition featured 40 photographs taken at the Manzanar War Relocation Center by Ansel Adams in 1943 and 26 prints by Leonard Frank recording the movement of Japanese Canadians in British Columbia in 1942. Together, the images provided an opportunity to reflect on the nature of forced separation and uprooting and the effects they have on their victims.Making Waves: Japanese American Photography, 1920-1940 (February 28-June 26, 2016) took an in-depth look at a lost legacy. In the early 1900s, groups of Japanese Americans formed photography clubs along the Pacific coast from Los Angeles to Seattle. Their photographs were exhibited and published internationally to considerable acclaim, and admired by other photographers including Edward Weston and L szl Moholy-Nagy. Sadly, much of this output was lost or destroyed during the forced incarceration of Japanese Americans at the onset of World War II. Making Waves presented 103 vintage photographs, largely by Los Angeles photographers, along with artifacts and ephemera that helped bring the era to life. Curated by writer and historian Dennis Reed, Making Waves commemorated the 30th anniversary of the first comprehensive exhibition of Japanese American photography, titled Japanese Photography in America, 1920-1940, also organized by Dennis Reed in 1986.Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami (May 29-August 21, 2016) presented the work of nine renowned artists who have been pushing the boundaries of origami to elevate what was once considered a children's craft into a sophisticated global art form. Each work was created specifically for this touring exhibition and presented a unique perspective on contemporary social, political, and aesthetic ideas. In the hands of these and other artists, the art form has evolved to encompass sculpture, large-scale installations, and conceptual works, as well as commentary on religious, social, and political issues. Above the Fold was curated by Asian art specialist Meher McArthur and toured by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC.Traveling exhibitions organized by the National Museum remain a significant source of revenue and exposure for the museum. During FY16, Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty traveled to the EMP Museum in Seattle, Washington, while Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World traveled to Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia; Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach, Florida; and Middlebury College Museum of Art in Middlebury, Vermont.
Program expenses $2,284,568.00   
Program revenue $226,842.00   
Program description Exhibitions-FY16After the closing of the blockbuster exhibition Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty, which generated record-breaking crowds and worldwide media coverage for the museum, the National Museum continued to offer diverse exhibitions that engaged a variety of constituencies and furthered the museum's mission of promoting understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity.Sugar/Islands: Finding Okinawa in Hawai'i (July 11-September 6, 2015) was a unique examination of worker migration and settlement from the islands of Okinawa to the islands of Hawai'i, prompted by opportunities afforded by the latter's sugar plantations and pineapple farms during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The exhibition incorporated paintings by Laura Kina and photographs by Emily Hanako Momohara, both fourth-generation, mixed-heritage women with familial roots in Okinawa and Hawai'i. Sugar/Islands and its related public programs gave the National Museum an important opportunity to engage in substantive ways with the Okinawan community and build stronger relationships with them.Before They Were Heroes: Sus Ito's World War II Images (July 14-September 6, 2015) celebrated the donation by Susumu "Sus" Ito of his vast archive of photographs and negatives taken while on duty during World War II. The exhibition's selection of photographs-along with excerpts from Ito's life history video, recorded by the National Museum's Media Arts Center-gave the public a rare and breathtaking look at the daily lives of the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion of the celebrated all-Japanese American 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Before They Were Heroes was enormously popular; events featuring appearances by Ito sold out, and media outlets including the LA Times ran profiles and rave reviews. Recognizing Ito's accomplishments was also gratifying on a personal level for museum staff and many others, as Ito passed away shortly after the exhibition closed.Jidai: Timeless Works of Samurai Art (August 1-30, 2015) was a special display that looked at the weaponry and armor of the samurai-Japan's elite warrior class. Assembled from collections in the greater Los Angeles area, Jidai featured rare and historically significant samurai artifacts dating as far back as the Kamakura Period (AD 1185-1333) in Japan. The display also examined ways this facet of Japanese culture has been preserved, embraced, and shared in America. Timed to coincide with Nisei Week (Little Tokyo's annual weeklong Japanese Festival), Jidai was warmly received by visitors. Daily attendance was notably high, and talks with the two curators attracted capacity crowds.Giant Robot Biennale 4 (October 11, 2015-January 24, 2016) continued a collaboration with pop culture entrepreneur Eric Nakamura that began in 2007. Launched in 1994 as a hand-assembled zine, Giant Robot is now recognized as a highly influential store and brand that encompasses many aspects of pop art, skateboarder, comic book, graphic arts, and vinyl toy culture. GRB4 examined the evolution of the Giant Robot aesthetic from its humble origins to its many celebrated manifestations. The highly anticipated exhibition included a drawing showcase, live performances in the galleries, a miniature recreation of the store featuring iconic objects from its history, and an interactive replica of exhibiting artist Edwin Ushiro's studio.Two Views: Photographs by Ansel Adams and Leonard Frank (February 28-April 24, 2016), a traveling exhibition organized by the Nikkei National Museum, presented a compelling collection of documentary images by two renowned 20th-century photographers, who captured distinctive views of the Japanese American and Japanese Canadian incarcerations during World War II. The exhibition featured 40 photographs taken at the Manzanar War Relocation Center by Ansel Adams in 1943 and 26 prints by Leonard Frank recording the movement of Japanese Canadians in British Columbia in 1942. Together, the images provided an opportunity to reflect on the nature of forced separation and uprooting and the effects they have on their victims.Making Waves: Japanese American Photography, 1920-1940 (February 28-June 26, 2016) took an in-depth look at a lost legacy. In the early 1900s, groups of Japanese Americans formed photography clubs along the Pacific coast from Los Angeles to Seattle. Their photographs were exhibited and published internationally to considerable acclaim, and admired by other photographers including Edward Weston and L szl Moholy-Nagy. Sadly, much of this output was lost or destroyed during the forced incarceration of Japanese Americans at the onset of World War II. Making Waves presented 103 vintage photographs, largely by Los Angeles photographers, along with artifacts and ephemera that helped bring the era to life. Curated by writer and historian Dennis Reed, Making Waves commemorated the 30th anniversary of the first comprehensive exhibition of Japanese American photography, titled Japanese Photography in America, 1920-1940, also organized by Dennis Reed in 1986.Above the Fold: New Expressions in Origami (May 29-August 21, 2016) presented the work of nine renowned artists who have been pushing the boundaries of origami to elevate what was once considered a children's craft into a sophisticated global art form. Each work was created specifically for this touring exhibition and presented a unique perspective on contemporary social, political, and aesthetic ideas. In the hands of these and other artists, the art form has evolved to encompass sculpture, large-scale installations, and conceptual works, as well as commentary on religious, social, and political issues. Above the Fold was curated by Asian art specialist Meher McArthur and toured by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC.Traveling exhibitions organized by the National Museum remain a significant source of revenue and exposure for the museum. During FY16, Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty traveled to the EMP Museum in Seattle, Washington, while Perseverance: Japanese Tattoo Tradition in a Modern World traveled to Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia; Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach, Florida; and Middlebury College Museum of Art in Middlebury, Vermont.   
Exhibitions-The National Museum presented a strong exhibition schedule and opened six new temporary exhibitions during FY13, as follows:-- Giant Robot Biennale 3 (September 23, 2012 - January 20, 2013), our third collaboration with Eric Nakamura of Giant Robot, and featuring a gallery of eight emerging artists along with a customized vinyl figure collection;-- Supernatural: The Art of Audrey Kawasaki, Edwin Ushiro, and Timothy Teruo Watters (February 9 - March 17, 2013), exploring superstitions and otherworldly concepts, illustrating how traditional ideas have evolved and been adapted over time;-- Patriots & Peacemakers: Arab Americans in Service to Our Country (February 16 - April 14, 2013), featuring true stories of heroism and self-sacrifice that affirm the important role Arab Americans have played in our country throughout its history;-- Visible & Invisible: A Hapa Japanese American History (April 7 - August 25, 2013), exploring the diverse and complex history of the mixed-race and mixed-roots Japanese American experience;-- American Heroes: Japanese American World War II Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal (May 4 - June 9, 2013), a display of the nation's highest civilian award, bestowed collectively on the U.S. Army's 100th Infantry Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, and the Military Intelligence Service for their extraordinary accomplishments during World War II; and-- Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter (May 11 - September 22, 2013), showcasing the diversity of contemporary Asian American identity through the groundbreaking work of seven visual artists.Exhibition organizers and programming partners included the Arab American National Museum, Giant Robot, USC Center for Japanese Religions and Culture, the Hapa Japan Database Project and Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES).In addition, the National Museum continued to travel our exhibitions Textured Lives: Japanese Immigrant Clothing from the Plantations of Hawai'i, Fighting for Democracy: Who is the 'We' in 'We, the People'? and kip fulbeck: part Asian, 100% hapa to venues which included the Bishop Museum, Levine Museum of the New South and Asia Society Texas Center, respectively.Within the Exhibitions department, the Production unit continued to support all aspects of the Museum in regards to design and fabrication of Museum elements. This included installation of onsite as well as traveling exhibitions, purchasing new media equipment for Common Ground and meeting ongoing requests to design and produce Museum collaterals, fundraising appeals, and marketing materials.
Program expenses    $1,811,645.00
Program revenue    $204,106.00
Program description    Exhibitions-The National Museum presented a strong exhibition schedule and opened six new temporary exhibitions during FY13, as follows:-- Giant Robot Biennale 3 (September 23, 2012 - January 20, 2013), our third collaboration with Eric Nakamura of Giant Robot, and featuring a gallery of eight emerging artists along with a customized vinyl figure collection;-- Supernatural: The Art of Audrey Kawasaki, Edwin Ushiro, and Timothy Teruo Watters (February 9 - March 17, 2013), exploring superstitions and otherworldly concepts, illustrating how traditional ideas have evolved and been adapted over time;-- Patriots & Peacemakers: Arab Americans in Service to Our Country (February 16 - April 14, 2013), featuring true stories of heroism and self-sacrifice that affirm the important role Arab Americans have played in our country throughout its history;-- Visible & Invisible: A Hapa Japanese American History (April 7 - August 25, 2013), exploring the diverse and complex history of the mixed-race and mixed-roots Japanese American experience;-- American Heroes: Japanese American World War II Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal (May 4 - June 9, 2013), a display of the nation's highest civilian award, bestowed collectively on the U.S. Army's 100th Infantry Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, and the Military Intelligence Service for their extraordinary accomplishments during World War II; and-- Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter (May 11 - September 22, 2013), showcasing the diversity of contemporary Asian American identity through the groundbreaking work of seven visual artists.Exhibition organizers and programming partners included the Arab American National Museum, Giant Robot, USC Center for Japanese Religions and Culture, the Hapa Japan Database Project and Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES).In addition, the National Museum continued to travel our exhibitions Textured Lives: Japanese Immigrant Clothing from the Plantations of Hawai'i, Fighting for Democracy: Who is the 'We' in 'We, the People'? and kip fulbeck: part Asian, 100% hapa to venues which included the Bishop Museum, Levine Museum of the New South and Asia Society Texas Center, respectively.Within the Exhibitions department, the Production unit continued to support all aspects of the Museum in regards to design and fabrication of Museum elements. This included installation of onsite as well as traveling exhibitions, purchasing new media equipment for Common Ground and meeting ongoing requests to design and produce Museum collaterals, fundraising appeals, and marketing materials.
JANM Store and janmstore.comThe JANM Store was the proud recipient of a 2017 Museum Store Association (MSA) Recognition Award for Product Development. The award recognized the Instructions to All Persons product line, which includes a tote bag and a t-shirt. Inspired by the Civilian Exclusion Orders posted during World War II to inform persons of Japanese ancestry of their impending forced removal and incarceration, these products perfectly embody the museum's mission to promote understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience. Maria Kwong, JANM's Director of Retail Enterprises and a current MSA board member, accepted the award at the MSA Conference & Expo in April. She also wrote an essay about how she came to develop these products, which was published on both the MSA blog and the JANM museum blog.As planned for FY17, the store undertook a long-overdue upgrade to its 20-year-old point-of-sale system. The transition to Retail Star began in July 2016, with the goal of being ready for the upcoming catalog season. It went smoothly, with a reasonable amount of tweaking. By the end of the fiscal year, store staff were able to complete the year-end inventory without any major problems.Following are high points in sales throughout the fiscal year. The Kubo special display and the opening of Tatau: Marks of Polynesia in July 2016 were responsible for onsite sales that were 45% higher than the same period in the previous year. Kubo merchandise accounted for about 13% of sales in the first two months of FY17. With the Tatau exhibition opening, the availability of the new catalog (with very high profit margins) accounted for a boost to online sales as well. Before the end of August, we had recouped our expenses for the total print run of Tatau catalogs by selling less than a third of the catalogs. Between sales of the Instructions t-shirts and the new Instructions poster, we had the best February revenue month in years (only exceeded by figures from February 2015, when Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty was up, and February 2001, at the close of Allen Say's Journey: The Art and Words of a Children's Book Author). In May, we had our first Citron Trunk Show during Member Appreciation Days. It was successful enough that we are bringing them back for the Holiday Edition of Member Appreciation Days in November.Overall, in spite of the fact that our net sales in FY17 were $24,670 lower than the previous year, our dollar margin (i.e. profit) was actually $1,470 higher than last year. This is due to the better profit margin we have on museum-produced products, such as the Instructions products and the Tatau catalog, which all sold well.
Program expenses$317,255.00    
Program revenue$213,915.00    
Program descriptionJANM Store and janmstore.comThe JANM Store was the proud recipient of a 2017 Museum Store Association (MSA) Recognition Award for Product Development. The award recognized the Instructions to All Persons product line, which includes a tote bag and a t-shirt. Inspired by the Civilian Exclusion Orders posted during World War II to inform persons of Japanese ancestry of their impending forced removal and incarceration, these products perfectly embody the museum's mission to promote understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Japanese American experience. Maria Kwong, JANM's Director of Retail Enterprises and a current MSA board member, accepted the award at the MSA Conference & Expo in April. She also wrote an essay about how she came to develop these products, which was published on both the MSA blog and the JANM museum blog.As planned for FY17, the store undertook a long-overdue upgrade to its 20-year-old point-of-sale system. The transition to Retail Star began in July 2016, with the goal of being ready for the upcoming catalog season. It went smoothly, with a reasonable amount of tweaking. By the end of the fiscal year, store staff were able to complete the year-end inventory without any major problems.Following are high points in sales throughout the fiscal year. The Kubo special display and the opening of Tatau: Marks of Polynesia in July 2016 were responsible for onsite sales that were 45% higher than the same period in the previous year. Kubo merchandise accounted for about 13% of sales in the first two months of FY17. With the Tatau exhibition opening, the availability of the new catalog (with very high profit margins) accounted for a boost to online sales as well. Before the end of August, we had recouped our expenses for the total print run of Tatau catalogs by selling less than a third of the catalogs. Between sales of the Instructions t-shirts and the new Instructions poster, we had the best February revenue month in years (only exceeded by figures from February 2015, when Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty was up, and February 2001, at the close of Allen Say's Journey: The Art and Words of a Children's Book Author). In May, we had our first Citron Trunk Show during Member Appreciation Days. It was successful enough that we are bringing them back for the Holiday Edition of Member Appreciation Days in November.Overall, in spite of the fact that our net sales in FY17 were $24,670 lower than the previous year, our dollar margin (i.e. profit) was actually $1,470 higher than last year. This is due to the better profit margin we have on museum-produced products, such as the Instructions products and the Tatau catalog, which all sold well.    
Public Programs-During 2012-2013, JANM offered a varied schedule of 101 public programs, which engaged a total of 20,153 individuals. Recognizing that the Japanese American community is growing more diverse and that the National Museum has the capacity to tell a broader American story, we are offering a strong range of programs that foster exploration of history, culture and identity among cultural communities. These programs include lectures, workshops, film screenings and free family activities.The National Museum continued to reach new visitors through our two signature Family Festivals, Summer Festival and Oshogatsu, which engaged 2,200 and 2,862 visitors, respectively. Additional programming highlights included:-- Opening reception for Giant Robot Biennale 3, September 22, 2012, with 1,566 attendees;-- Target Free Family Saturday: Make Some Noise, March 9, 2013, with 1,215 guests; -- Beyond the Bad and the Ugly: Stereotypes and Asian American Pop Culture A Summit, March 23, 2013, 210 guests; and -- V3con Digital Media Conference, June 15, 2013, 350 guests.Many of our public programs resulted from collaborations with Los Angeles-based organizations, including: ADL Asian Jewish Initiative; API Equality-LA; Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), Greater Los Angeles Area; East West Players; The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles; UCLA; USC; and We Tell Stories. New programming partners during 2012-2013 included the Arab American National Museum, Grow Your Own Media and the Turath Ensemble.
Program expenses    $542,394.00
Program description    Public Programs-During 2012-2013, JANM offered a varied schedule of 101 public programs, which engaged a total of 20,153 individuals. Recognizing that the Japanese American community is growing more diverse and that the National Museum has the capacity to tell a broader American story, we are offering a strong range of programs that foster exploration of history, culture and identity among cultural communities. These programs include lectures, workshops, film screenings and free family activities.The National Museum continued to reach new visitors through our two signature Family Festivals, Summer Festival and Oshogatsu, which engaged 2,200 and 2,862 visitors, respectively. Additional programming highlights included:-- Opening reception for Giant Robot Biennale 3, September 22, 2012, with 1,566 attendees;-- Target Free Family Saturday: Make Some Noise, March 9, 2013, with 1,215 guests; -- Beyond the Bad and the Ugly: Stereotypes and Asian American Pop Culture A Summit, March 23, 2013, 210 guests; and -- V3con Digital Media Conference, June 15, 2013, 350 guests.Many of our public programs resulted from collaborations with Los Angeles-based organizations, including: ADL Asian Jewish Initiative; API Equality-LA; Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), Greater Los Angeles Area; East West Players; The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles; UCLA; USC; and We Tell Stories. New programming partners during 2012-2013 included the Arab American National Museum, Grow Your Own Media and the Turath Ensemble.
Public Programs-FY16The National Museum offered 155 public programs that served a total of 26,725 people. These included family festivals, craft workshops, talks, panel discussions, book readings, film screenings, walking tours, and a variety of other activities. Several of these events were community partnerships and collaborations with such entities as TAIKOPROJECT, Kollaboration, Nikkei Genealogical Society, East West Players, Los Angeles International Tea Festival, Asians on Film Festival, Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival, Mixed Remixed Festival, and V3 Digital Media Conference, among others. Particularly popular programs included a Members Only conversation with Sus Ito, whose World War II photographs were featured in the National Museum's Before They Were Heroes exhibition, on July 12, 2015; a Members Only tour of the special display Jidai: Timeless Works of Samurai Art on August 15, 2015; a conference celebrating the legacy of civil rights leader Minoru Yasui on April 30, 2016; and a talk with Dave Roberts, the first ethnic minority manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers, on June 18, 2016. All of these programs sold out.The museum's signature Free Family Day events, featuring a variety of crafts, activities, and performances inspired by seasonal themes, continued to attract large and diverse audiences. The July 2015 edition, titled "Okinawan Traditions" as a tie-in with the exhibition Sugar/Islands: Finding Okinawa in Hawai'i, presented the museum with the opportunity to work with the Okinawan Association of America to showcase Okinawan artists and culture. Natsumatsuri (Summer) Family Festival and Oshogatsu (New Year) Family Festival, the National Museum's two biggest Free Family Day events, drew 2,930 and 3,287 attendees, respectively. Other Free Family Days drew between 500 and 1,200 attendees.Two new public program series debuted this past fiscal year. The first was the National Museum Summer Night Concerts, a free outdoor concert series on the museum's plaza featuring Asian and Pacific Islander American (APIA) performers. The concerts kicked off on July 30 with an evening of pop and hip hop featuring Magnetic North and Taiyo Na, which attracted 757 guests. Electronica night with headliner Paul Dateh followed on August 27, attracting 529 guests. These events, which were well received, introduced a new generation of APIAs to the National Museum and created a festive gathering space to celebrate APIA culture and identity. The second new series was Mottainai Yoga with traci ishigo, a yogi, community organizer, and activist. Offered on a recurring basis, Mottainai Yoga has attracted participants of all ages and levels and diversified the National Museum's offerings to include physical activity for health.
Program expenses $800,831.00   
Program description Public Programs-FY16The National Museum offered 155 public programs that served a total of 26,725 people. These included family festivals, craft workshops, talks, panel discussions, book readings, film screenings, walking tours, and a variety of other activities. Several of these events were community partnerships and collaborations with such entities as TAIKOPROJECT, Kollaboration, Nikkei Genealogical Society, East West Players, Los Angeles International Tea Festival, Asians on Film Festival, Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival, Mixed Remixed Festival, and V3 Digital Media Conference, among others. Particularly popular programs included a Members Only conversation with Sus Ito, whose World War II photographs were featured in the National Museum's Before They Were Heroes exhibition, on July 12, 2015; a Members Only tour of the special display Jidai: Timeless Works of Samurai Art on August 15, 2015; a conference celebrating the legacy of civil rights leader Minoru Yasui on April 30, 2016; and a talk with Dave Roberts, the first ethnic minority manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers, on June 18, 2016. All of these programs sold out.The museum's signature Free Family Day events, featuring a variety of crafts, activities, and performances inspired by seasonal themes, continued to attract large and diverse audiences. The July 2015 edition, titled "Okinawan Traditions" as a tie-in with the exhibition Sugar/Islands: Finding Okinawa in Hawai'i, presented the museum with the opportunity to work with the Okinawan Association of America to showcase Okinawan artists and culture. Natsumatsuri (Summer) Family Festival and Oshogatsu (New Year) Family Festival, the National Museum's two biggest Free Family Day events, drew 2,930 and 3,287 attendees, respectively. Other Free Family Days drew between 500 and 1,200 attendees.Two new public program series debuted this past fiscal year. The first was the National Museum Summer Night Concerts, a free outdoor concert series on the museum's plaza featuring Asian and Pacific Islander American (APIA) performers. The concerts kicked off on July 30 with an evening of pop and hip hop featuring Magnetic North and Taiyo Na, which attracted 757 guests. Electronica night with headliner Paul Dateh followed on August 27, attracting 529 guests. These events, which were well received, introduced a new generation of APIAs to the National Museum and created a festive gathering space to celebrate APIA culture and identity. The second new series was Mottainai Yoga with traci ishigo, a yogi, community organizer, and activist. Offered on a recurring basis, Mottainai Yoga has attracted participants of all ages and levels and diversified the National Museum's offerings to include physical activity for health.   
Public Programs-In FY15, the National Museum offered 135 public programs that served a total of 36,193 people. These included family festivals, craft workshops, talks, panel discussions, book readings, film screenings, walking tours, and a variety of other activities.The National Museum's signature Free Family Day events continued to attract large and diverse audiences. The two biggest, Natsumatsuri (Summer) Family Festival and Oshogatsu (New Year) Family Festival, drew 3,751 and 4,197 attendees, respectively. Other Free Family Days drew between 800 and 4,600 attendees.In an effort to continue spotlighting the talents and achievements of Asian Americans, a new public program series was launched in February 2015. Big Trouble in Little Tokyo (BTLT), organized in partnership with Angry Asian Man, First Pond Entertainment, and Visual Communications, is a film series that highlights gems of Asian American cinema and presents panel discussions with directors, actors, and crew. To date, BTLT has presented The Joy Luck Club, The Curse of Quon Gwon, and The Motel, among other films.Discover Nikkei: the National Museum's Discover Nikkei project is a major online resource that brings together the voices and experiences of Nikkei (Japanese emigrants and their descendants) who have created communities throughout the world. The multilingual website-available in English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese-documents Nikkei history and culture and provides learning and networking tools for Nikkei around the world. This year, Discover Nikkei celebrates its tenth anniversary with a special page inviting the site's international readership to answer questions about themselves and their communities. Updated with a new question every month, the page is envisioned as an opportunity for a global network of Nikkei to "meet" one another and compare experiences.Significant technical improvements were made to the DiscoverNikkei.org website in FY15. Targeting has been improved by reprogramming the backend logic used to list and organize content: series, authors, and articles. Now, all content is first organized by language and is shown in the user's selected language. A new sorting functionality has been added to list view, enabling readers to discover more content that is of interest to them.Usability has been improved by creating entirely new, modern layouts, as well as related index, browse, and search pages. A major new feature is the "tile waterfall," which shows an endless cascade of article tiles by the selected language at the bottom of the entire Journal section and home page. This allows users to discover all the content the site has to offer with minimal effort. Overall performance has also been improved by re-programming the entire back-end logic used to enhance experiences in the Journal section.The Nikkei Chronicles project, which puts out a themed call every year for original stories from Nikkei communities around the world, continued with Nikkei Names: Taro, John, Juan, Ju o? Writers were asked to explore the meanings, origins, and the untold stories behind personal Nikkei names. Thirty-six 36 stories were received in English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese, from Brazil, Canada, Peru, and the United States. In conjunction with this series, Discover Nikkei offered complimentary writing workshops in collaboration with local Nikkei organizations in multiple cities and countries. Through this and other projects, Discover Nikkei made steady progress in increasing the site's original content and expanding its global network of readers and contributors.During FY15, DiscoverNikkei.org recorded 323,031 unique visitors, representing 403,763 sessions. The average monthly user sessions were 33,647. The majority of visitors are from the United States (40%), and there is also consistently high visitation from Japan (29%). The visitations from Brazil and Peru are the third and fourth highest. As of June 5, 2015, Discover Nikkei has 1,881 Facebook "Likes" and 2,641 followers on Twitter.
Program expenses  $1,366,879.00  
Program description  Public Programs-In FY15, the National Museum offered 135 public programs that served a total of 36,193 people. These included family festivals, craft workshops, talks, panel discussions, book readings, film screenings, walking tours, and a variety of other activities.The National Museum's signature Free Family Day events continued to attract large and diverse audiences. The two biggest, Natsumatsuri (Summer) Family Festival and Oshogatsu (New Year) Family Festival, drew 3,751 and 4,197 attendees, respectively. Other Free Family Days drew between 800 and 4,600 attendees.In an effort to continue spotlighting the talents and achievements of Asian Americans, a new public program series was launched in February 2015. Big Trouble in Little Tokyo (BTLT), organized in partnership with Angry Asian Man, First Pond Entertainment, and Visual Communications, is a film series that highlights gems of Asian American cinema and presents panel discussions with directors, actors, and crew. To date, BTLT has presented The Joy Luck Club, The Curse of Quon Gwon, and The Motel, among other films.Discover Nikkei: the National Museum's Discover Nikkei project is a major online resource that brings together the voices and experiences of Nikkei (Japanese emigrants and their descendants) who have created communities throughout the world. The multilingual website-available in English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese-documents Nikkei history and culture and provides learning and networking tools for Nikkei around the world. This year, Discover Nikkei celebrates its tenth anniversary with a special page inviting the site's international readership to answer questions about themselves and their communities. Updated with a new question every month, the page is envisioned as an opportunity for a global network of Nikkei to "meet" one another and compare experiences.Significant technical improvements were made to the DiscoverNikkei.org website in FY15. Targeting has been improved by reprogramming the backend logic used to list and organize content: series, authors, and articles. Now, all content is first organized by language and is shown in the user's selected language. A new sorting functionality has been added to list view, enabling readers to discover more content that is of interest to them.Usability has been improved by creating entirely new, modern layouts, as well as related index, browse, and search pages. A major new feature is the "tile waterfall," which shows an endless cascade of article tiles by the selected language at the bottom of the entire Journal section and home page. This allows users to discover all the content the site has to offer with minimal effort. Overall performance has also been improved by re-programming the entire back-end logic used to enhance experiences in the Journal section.The Nikkei Chronicles project, which puts out a themed call every year for original stories from Nikkei communities around the world, continued with Nikkei Names: Taro, John, Juan, Ju o? Writers were asked to explore the meanings, origins, and the untold stories behind personal Nikkei names. Thirty-six 36 stories were received in English, Japanese, Spanish, and Portuguese, from Brazil, Canada, Peru, and the United States. In conjunction with this series, Discover Nikkei offered complimentary writing workshops in collaboration with local Nikkei organizations in multiple cities and countries. Through this and other projects, Discover Nikkei made steady progress in increasing the site's original content and expanding its global network of readers and contributors.During FY15, DiscoverNikkei.org recorded 323,031 unique visitors, representing 403,763 sessions. The average monthly user sessions were 33,647. The majority of visitors are from the United States (40%), and there is also consistently high visitation from Japan (29%). The visitations from Brazil and Peru are the third and fourth highest. As of June 5, 2015, Discover Nikkei has 1,881 Facebook "Likes" and 2,641 followers on Twitter.  
Financial data
Revenue
Total revenue$6,569,992.00$4,290,855.00$7,065,826.00 $6,580,424.00
Revenue from contributions (total)$4,666,862.00$2,931,489.00$4,270,674.00$4,097,255.00$5,346,562.00
Revenue from noncash contributions$150,941.00$109,959.00$110,856.00  
Investment income, current yr$636,196.00$401,316.00$371,096.00 $440,509.00
Total revenue from grants, etc., current yr$4,666,862.00$2,931,489.00$4,270,674.00 $5,346,562.00
Total unrelated business revenue$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Other revenue, current yr$998,987.00$731,208.00$1,278,823.00 $589,247.00
Net unrelated business taxable revenue$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Program service revenue (total)$267,947.00$226,842.00$1,145,233.00$208,128.00$204,106.00
Gross receipts$13,590,958.00$5,840,050.00$8,096,577.00 $10,878,723.00
Sources of contributions
Contributions revenue from membership dues$672,654.00$649,672.00$825,141.00 $666,021.00
Revenue from fundraising events$972,513.00$956,796.00$1,127,855.00 $1,029,117.00
Revenue from gov't grants    $242,094.00
Revenue from all other contributions$3,021,695.00$1,325,021.00$2,317,678.00 $3,409,330.00
Other types of revenue
Miscellaneous revenue (total)$322,019.00$206,641.00$196,453.00 $121,816.00
Income from dividends, interest, and similar investments$237,123.00$421,751.00$373,282.00 $295,218.00
Net rental income$463,053.00$381,592.00$412,321.00$355,339.00$265,505.00
Net income from fundraising events$0.00$0.00$0.00 $0.00
Net inventory sales (total)$213,915.00$142,975.00$670,049.00 $201,926.00
Expense categories (totals)
Total functional expenses: sum of all$6,296,885.00$6,312,071.00$6,896,084.00 $5,394,438.00
Total functional expenses: program service $4,592,119.00$4,631,288.00$4,894,807.00 $3,606,175.00
Total functional expenses: management and general$1,034,344.00$1,095,389.00$1,152,327.00 $1,006,072.00
Total functional expenses: fundraising$670,422.00$585,394.00$848,950.00 $782,191.00
Fees for services
Legal fees (total)$8,342.00$8,375.00$13,631.00 $24,574.00
Fundraising service fees (total)$0.00$1,375.00$14,775.00 $13,200.00
Assets and liabilities
Total assets$51,144,346.00$50,662,586.00$53,842,510.00$54,444,726.00$54,979,906.00
Total assets, beginning of year$50,662,586.00$53,842,510.00$54,444,726.00 $55,659,201.00
Total liabilities$3,919,067.00$4,274,925.00$4,987,277.00$5,594,212.00$6,406,674.00
Total liabilities, beginning of year$4,274,925.00$4,987,277.00$5,594,212.00 $8,641,746.00
Pledges & accounts receivable, net$1,149,611.00$389,472.00$604,225.00 $796,500.00
Unrestricted net assets, end of yr$19,900,416.00$20,649,121.00$21,577,818.00 $21,617,081.00
Temporarily restricted net assets$18,358,462.00$16,807,358.00$18,388,534.00 $18,282,062.00
Permanently restricted net assets, end of yr$8,966,401.00$8,931,182.00$8,888,881.00 $8,674,089.00
Net assets$47,225,279.00$46,387,661.00$48,855,233.00 $48,573,232.00
Net assets, beginning of year$46,387,661.00$48,855,233.00$48,850,514.00 $47,017,455.00
Other liabilities$240,344.00$231,420.00$269,001.00 $330,941.00
Bond liabilities$3,050,000.00$3,370,000.00$3,925,000.00 $5,400,000.00
Other assets$15,282,869.00$15,327,975.00$15,937,903.00 $16,373,408.00
Investments: other securities$36,000.00$36,000.00$36,000.00 $36,000.00
Investments: publicly traded securities$12,546,253.00$12,433,551.00$13,137,957.00 $11,785,013.00
Cash: non-interest bearing$113,772.00$194,442.00$1,207,402.00 $1,815,201.00
Cash: non-interest bearing, beginning of year$194,442.00$1,207,402.00$1,208,827.00 $1,123,179.00
Inventories for sale or use$358,286.00$371,369.00$408,641.00 $183,218.00
Other financial variables
Revenue less expenses$273,107.00-$2,021,216.00$169,742.00 $1,185,986.00
Advertising (total)$42,068.00$28,787.00$29,885.00 $47,550.00
Savings & temp cash investment$951,804.00$581,742.00$698,900.00 $1,103,218.00
Prepaid expenses & deferred charges$196,801.00$268,315.00$206,999.00 $511,423.00
Accounts payable & accrued expenses$606,223.00$636,005.00$740,776.00 $464,994.00
Deferred revenue    $128,239.00
Unsecured notes & loans to unrelated parties$22,500.00$37,500.00$52,500.00 $82,500.00
Total net assets or fund balances$47,225,279.00$46,387,661.00$48,855,233.00 $48,573,232.00
Depreciation, depletion, amortization$843,250.00$802,150.00$722,003.00 $634,313.00
Governance and accountability
Number of voting members232323 22
Number of independent voting members222222 21
Financial sheets auditedTrueTrueTrue True
Relationships among key personnel  True True
Accrual accountingTrueTrueTrue True
Tax year start date2016-07-012015-07-012014-07-01 2012-07-01
Tax year end date2017-06-012016-06-012015-06-012014-06-012013-06-01
Metadata about the filing
E-return type: 990, 990EZ, or 990PF990990990 990
Date e-filing submitted2018-03-012017-08-222016-01-22 2013-12-06
IRS schema version2016v3.02015v3.02014v5.0 2012v2.1
Filing identifier201830099349301653201741019349301064201513209349314166 201333119349302218
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