Escuela de Agricultura de la Region Tropical humeda

Address
PO Box 4442-1000
San Jose, FO 00000-0000
CS
Contact
Website: http://www.earth.ac.cr
Phone: +1 (502) 713-0000
Nonprofit
NTEE: B43 - University or Technological Institute
EIN: 98-0149857

Mission

ESCUELA DE AGRICULTURA DE LA REGION TROPICAL HUMEDA ("EARTH") IS AN INTERNATIONAL, PRIVATE, NOT-FOR-PROFIT UNIVERSITY DEDICATED TO EDUCATION, EXTENSION, RESEARCH AND THE GENERATION OF VALUE THROUGH PRODUCTIONS, TRANSFORMATION AND COMMERCIALIZATION ACTIVITIES. THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM, LEADING TO A "LICENCIATURA" DEGREE, EMPHASIZES THE AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES AND THE RATIONAL MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES. THE UNIVERSITY SEEKS TO CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, WITH A SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON THE HUMID TROPICS; A REGION CHARACTERIZED BY IMMENSE BIOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL RICHNESS, YET THREATENED BY SOCIAL MARGINALIZATION AND INAPPROPRIATE AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. OUR VISION: OUR ACTIONS ARE DIRECTED TOWARDS BUILDING A FUTURE IN WHICH THE HUMID TROPICS AND ITS COMMUNITIES ACHIEVE SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL WELL BEING. OUR MISSION: PREPARE LEADERS WITH ETHICAL VALUES TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMID TROPICS AND TO CONSTRUCT A PROSPE
 201620152014
Basic features of the organization
Year of formation1990
Subsection501(c)(3)
Organization typeCorporation
Human resources, including compensation
Summary compensation info
Total compensation of current key personnel$1,014,196.00$931,231.00$693,413.00
Sum of reportable (W2/1099) compensation$883,282.00$809,882.00$607,469.00
Number of employees000
Number of people compensated >$100k333
Number of volunteers000
Number of highly compensated contractors000
Personnel
Alaoui, Abdallah
Titletrusteetrusteetrustee
Name of key/compensated personMr Abdallah AlaouiMr Abdallah AlaouiMr Abdallah Alaoui
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Alvarado, Edgar
Titledean  
Name of key/compensated persondr edgar alvarado  
Average hours per week working for org40.0  
Reportable compensation from org$108,313.00  
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$13,414.00  
PositionOfficer  
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00  
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.0  
Alvardo, Edgar
Title deandean
Name of key/compensated person dr edgar alvardodr edgar alvardo
Average hours per week working for org 40.040.0
Reportable compensation from org $105,169.00$100,103.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs $12,866.00$0.00
Position OfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs  $0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs 0.00.0
Andrew, Anne
Titletrusteetrusteetrustee
Name of key/compensated personms Anne Slaughter Andrewms Anne Slaughter Andrewms Anne Slaughter Andrew
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Brenninkmeyer, Marisa
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee
Name of key/compensated personMrs Marisa BrenninkmeyerMrs Marisa BrenninkmeyerMrs Marisa Brenninkmeyer
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Chang-Diaz, Franklin
Titletrusteetrusteetrustee
Name of key/compensated personMr Franklin Chang-DiazMr Franklin Chang-DiazMr Franklin Chang-Diaz
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Durman, Francis
TitleTrustee  
Name of key/compensated personFrancis Durman  
Average hours per week working for org2.0  
Reportable compensation from org$0.00  
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00  
PositionIndividual trustee or director  
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00  
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.0  
Esquivel, Francis
Title trusteetrustee
Name of key/compensated person Mr Francis Durman EsquivelMr Francis Durman Esquivel
Average hours per week working for org 2.02.0
Reportable compensation from org $0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs $0.00$0.00
Position Individual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs  $0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs 0.00.0
Gonzalez, Ing
Title  Trustee
Name of key/compensated person  Ing Carlos Enrique Gonzalez
Average hours per week working for org  2.0
Reportable compensation from org  $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs  $0.00
Position  Individual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs   $0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs  0.0
Gonzlez, Carlos
Title Trustee 
Name of key/compensated person Carlos Enrique Gonzlez 
Average hours per week working for org 2.0 
Reportable compensation from org $0.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs $0.00 
Position Individual trustee or director 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs  $0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs 0.0 
Kelso, Alan
Titlevice presidentvice presidentvice president
Name of key/compensated personSr Alan H KelsoSr Alan H KelsoSr Alan H Kelso
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or director, OfficerIndividual trustee or director, OfficerIndividual trustee or director, Officer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Kjorven, Olav
Titletrusteetrusteetrustee
Name of key/compensated personMr Olav KjorvenMr Olav KjorvenMr Olav Kjorven
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Leon, Pedro
Titlesecretarysecretarysecretary
Name of key/compensated personDr Pedro E LeonDr Pedro E LeonDr Pedro E Leon
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or director, OfficerIndividual trustee or director, OfficerIndividual trustee or director, Officer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Mirabelli, Gerardo
TitleDirectorDirectorDirector
Name of key/compensated personMr Gerardo MirabelliMr Gerardo MirabelliMr Gerardo Mirabelli
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.0
Reportable compensation from org$87,332.00$85,620.00$83,991.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$15,074.00$15,221.00$13,452.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Mora, Roger
TitleDirector Commercial FarmDirector Commercial Farm 
Name of key/compensated personMr Roger Ruiz MoraMr Roger Ruiz Mora 
Average hours per week working for org40.040.0 
Reportable compensation from org$89,709.00$87,950.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$15,815.00$14,684.00 
PositionOfficerOfficer 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.0 
Moser, Bobby
TitleTrustee  
Name of key/compensated personBobby Moser  
Average hours per week working for org2.0  
Reportable compensation from org$0.00  
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00  
PositionIndividual trustee or director  
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00  
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.0  
Murillo, Carlos
TitleDirector Campus La FlorDirector Campus La FlorDirector Campus La Flor
Name of key/compensated personDr Carlos MurilloDr Carlos MurilloDr Carlos Murillo
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.0
Reportable compensation from org$80,860.00$79,275.00$77,767.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$14,451.00$14,491.00$12,789.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Quirs, Ramn
TitleHR DirectorHR Director 
Name of key/compensated personMr Ramn Gonzlez QuirsMr Ramn Gonzlez Quirs 
Average hours per week working for org40.040.0 
Reportable compensation from org$98,639.00$94,521.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$9,980.00$8,363.00 
PositionOfficerOfficer 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.0 
Sherrard, Daniel
TitleProvostProvostProvost
Name of key/compensated personDr Daniel SherrardDr Daniel SherrardDr Daniel Sherrard
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.0
Reportable compensation from org$141,618.00$137,188.00$129,637.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$20,193.00$21,759.00$17,200.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Solso, T
Title  president
Name of key/compensated person  Sr T M Tim Solso
Average hours per week working for org  2.0
Reportable compensation from org  $0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs  $0.00
Position  Individual trustee or director, Officer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs   $0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs  0.0
Solso, Theodore
Titlepresidentpresident 
Name of key/compensated personSr Theodore M Tim SolsoSr Theodore M Tim Solso 
Average hours per week working for org2.02.0 
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00 
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00 
PositionIndividual trustee or director, OfficerIndividual trustee or director, Officer 
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00 
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.0 
Teague, Randal
TitlePres. of Junta de FiduciariosPres. of Junta de Fiduciariostrustee
Name of key/compensated personRandal TeagueRandal TeagueDr Randal C Teague Sr
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Zaglul, Jose
TitleRectorRectorRector
Name of key/compensated personDr Jose ZaglulDr Jose ZaglulDr Jose Zaglul
Average hours per week working for org40.040.040.0
Reportable compensation from org$276,811.00$220,159.00$215,971.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$41,986.00$33,967.00$31,005.00
PositionOfficerOfficerOfficer
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
de Riojas, Ana
TitleTrusteeTrusteeTrustee
Name of key/compensated personAna Regina Aguirre de RiojasMrs Ana Regina Aguirre de RiojasMrs Ana Regina Aguirre de Riojas
Average hours per week working for org2.02.02.0
Reportable compensation from org$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other comp, non-reportable, from org and related orgs$0.00$0.00$0.00
PositionIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or directorIndividual trustee or director
Corresponding comp from related orgs
Reportable compensation from related orgs $0.00$0.00$0.00
Average hours per week working for related orgs0.00.00.0
Purpose: mission, activities & accomplishments
Mission or significant activitiesPrepare leaders with ethical values to contribute to the sustainable development of the tropics and to construct a prosperous and just society.Prepare leaders with ethical values to contribute to the sustainable development of the tropics and to construct a prosperous and just society.Prepare leaders with ethical values to contribute to the sustainable development of the tropics and to construct a prosperous and just society.
Program expenses (total)$28,214,320.00$26,529,761.00$24,183,458.00
Programs, including revenue & expenses
Agri-business banana plantation - the university operates a banana plantation that assists its students to learn the values and ethics of biodiversity and sustainable agriculture. The operation of the plantation supports the institution economically and academically. The university, in conjunction with the Kellogg foundation, developed renewable products (such as paper) from the waste - a model that has proven instrumental in environmental conservation in latin america. The University's agri-business endeavors extend beyond the plantation, as the students get involved in the sale of crop seeds, livestock, and other agricultural commodities. These activites teach the students to be conscientious and dutiful stewards of the earth and its finite resources.
Program expenses$9,052,837.00$7,096,066.00$6,670,735.00
Grants and allocations made$0.00$0.00$0.00
Program revenue$10,048,845.00$7,586,246.00$7,001,392.00
Program descriptionAgri-business banana plantation - the university operates a banana plantation that assists its students to learn the values and ethics of biodiversity and sustainable agriculture. The operation of the plantation supports the institution economically and academically. The university, in conjunction with the Kellogg foundation, developed renewable products (such as paper) from the waste - a model that has proven instrumental in environmental conservation in latin america. The University's agri-business endeavors extend beyond the plantation, as the students get involved in the sale of crop seeds, livestock, and other agricultural commodities. These activites teach the students to be conscientious and dutiful stewards of the earth and its finite resources.Agri-business banana plantation - the university operates a banana plantation that assists its students to learn the values and ethics of biodiversity and sustainable agriculture. The operation of the plantation supports the institution economically and academically. The university, in conjunction with the Kellogg foundation, developed renewable products (such as paper) from the waste - a model that has proven instrumental in environmental conservation in latin america. The University's agri-business endeavors extend beyond the plantation, as the students get involved in the sale of crop seeds, livestock, and other agricultural commodities. These activites teach the students to be conscientious and dutiful stewards of the earth and its finite resources.Agri-business banana plantation - the university operates a banana plantation that assists its students to learn the values and ethics of biodiversity and sustainable agriculture. The operation of the plantation supports the institution economically and academically. The university, in conjunction with the Kellogg foundation, developed renewable products (such as paper) from the waste-a model that has proven instrumental in environmental conservation in latin america. The University's agri-business endeavors extend beyond the plantation, as the students get involved in the sale of crop seeds, livestock, and other agricultural commodities. These activites teach the students to be conscientious and dutiful stewards of the earth and its finite resources.
For over 25 years, the University has sought out extraordinary youth from underprivileged communities in over 40 countries and given them the chance to learn and grow as professionals and, more importantly, as human beings with values and ethics. 90% of Earth's student body return to their countries of origin and make a positive social, environmental and ecomonic impact. From rural communities in South America to villages in Africa, Earth's students and graduates are improving labor conditions, starting their own businesses, generating employment, defending biodiversity and promoting sustainable development practices. Academic programs - the university curriculum includes four distinct educational activities that focus on experiential learning: student entrepreneurial projects, work experience, internships, and professional experience. Academic support programs - In addition to its core curriculum, the university stresses active participation through planned activities, laboratory and field work as well as independent research projects. The university carries out innovative research that is directed at improving agriculTural production practices to address the challenges that currently confront rural communities in the tropics. EARTHs campus has an academic farm which is used by the students as a laboratory to do work in their fields. The commercial farm is used to develop agricultural activities and generate money to support the academic program. The campus provides sports facilities such as soccer fields, baseball fields and tennis courts. There is also a gym that can be used for basketball, volleyball and indoor soccer. The gym includes a weight room and a pool. In addition, the students have access to different services such as Internet, mail, fax couriers, cafeteria, laundry room, medical services, psychological and nutritional services, and personal physical training. In 2016, the School had a banner year, with the following highlights: 1. 412 students hailing from 42 countries 2. 47% female student population 3. 80% of students matriculating on full or partial scholarship 4. 85% of students graduate in four or five years The amount reflected as grants in Program Service 4a represent student stipends and amounts paid to local rural communities. Scholarship expenses are not recorded in the functional expenses of the Form 990.
Program expenses$14,051,834.00$13,349,843.00$12,338,835.00
Grants and allocations made$529,630.00$388,508.00$330,929.00
Program revenue$12,379,893.00$11,728,472.00$10,644,599.00
Program descriptionFor over 25 years, the University has sought out extraordinary youth from underprivileged communities in over 40 countries and given them the chance to learn and grow as professionals and, more importantly, as human beings with values and ethics. 90% of Earth's student body return to their countries of origin and make a positive social, environmental and ecomonic impact. From rural communities in South America to villages in Africa, Earth's students and graduates are improving labor conditions, starting their own businesses, generating employment, defending biodiversity and promoting sustainable development practices. Academic programs - the university curriculum includes four distinct educational activities that focus on experiential learning: student entrepreneurial projects, work experience, internships, and professional experience. Academic support programs - In addition to its core curriculum, the university stresses active participation through planned activities, laboratory and field work as well as independent research projects. The university carries out innovative research that is directed at improving agriculTural production practices to address the challenges that currently confront rural communities in the tropics. EARTHs campus has an academic farm which is used by the students as a laboratory to do work in their fields. The commercial farm is used to develop agricultural activities and generate money to support the academic program. The campus provides sports facilities such as soccer fields, baseball fields and tennis courts. There is also a gym that can be used for basketball, volleyball and indoor soccer. The gym includes a weight room and a pool. In addition, the students have access to different services such as Internet, mail, fax couriers, cafeteria, laundry room, medical services, psychological and nutritional services, and personal physical training. In 2016, the School had a banner year, with the following highlights: 1. 412 students hailing from 42 countries 2. 47% female student population 3. 80% of students matriculating on full or partial scholarship 4. 85% of students graduate in four or five years The amount reflected as grants in Program Service 4a represent student stipends and amounts paid to local rural communities. Scholarship expenses are not recorded in the functional expenses of the Form 990.For over 25 years, the University has sought out extraordinary youth from underprivileged communities in over 40 countries and given them the chance to learn and grow as professionals and, more importantly, as human beings with values and ethics. 97% of Earth's student body return to their countries of origin and make a positive social, environmental and ecomonic impact. From rural communities in South America to villages in Africa, Earth's students and graduates are improving labor conditions, starting their own businesses, generating employment, defending biodiversity and promoting sustainable development practices. Academic programs - the university curriculum includes four distinct educational activities that focus on experiential learning: student entrepreneurial projects, work experience, internships, and professional experience. Academic support programs - In addition to its core curriculum, the university stresses active participation through planned activities, laboratory and field work as well as independent research projects. The university carries out innovative research that is directed at improving agriculTural production practices to address the challenges that currently confront rural communities in the tropics. EARTHs campus has an academic farm which is used by the students as a laboratory to do work in their fields. The commercial farm is used to develop agricultural activities and generate money to support the academic program. The campus provides sports facilities such as soccer fields, baseball fields and tennis courts. There is also a gym that can be used for basketball, volleyball and indoor soccer. The gym includes a weight room and a pool. In addition, the students have access to different services such as Internet, mail, fax couriers, cafeteria, laundry room, medical services, psychological and nutritional services, and personal physical training. In 2015, the School had a banner year, with the following highlights: 1. 415 students hailing from 40 countries 2. 41% female student population 3. 70% of students matriculating on full scholarship 4. 85% of students graduate in four or five years 5. 7,500 unique visitors to our two campuses The amount reflected as grants in Program Service 4a represent student stipends and amounts paid to local rural communities. Scholarship expenses are not recorded in the functional expenses of the Form 990.For over 25 years, the University has sought out extraordinary youth from underprivileged communities in over 40 countries and given them the chance to learn and grow as professionals and, more importantly, as human beings with values and ethics. 97% of Earth's student body return to their countries of origin and make a positive social, environmental and ecomonic impact. From rural communities in South America to villages in Africa, Earth's students and graduates are improving labor conditions, starting their own businesses, generating employment, defending biodiversity and promoting sustainable development practices. Academic programs - the university curriculum includes four distinct educational activities that focus on experiential learning: student entrepreneurial projects, work experience, internships, and professional experience. Academic support programs - In addition to its core curriculum, the university stresses active participation through planned activities, laboratory and field work as well as independent research projects. The university carries out innovative research that is directed at improving agriculTural production practices to address the challenges that currently confront rural communities in the tropics. EARTHs campus has an academic farm which is used by the students as a laboratory to do work in their fields. The commercial farm is used to develop agricultural activities and generate money to support the academic program. The campus provides sports facilities such as soccer fields, baseball fields and tennis courts. There is also a gym that can be used for basketball, volleyball and indoor soccer. The gym includes a weight room and a pool. In addition, the students have access to different services such as Internet, mail, fax couriers, cafeteria, laundry room, medical services, psychological and nutritional services, and personal physical training. In 2014, the School had a banner year, with the following highlights: 1. 422 students hailing from 43 countries 2. 40% female student population (our highest % ever) 3. 70% of students matriculating on full scholarship. 4. 84% of students graduate in four or five years 5. 7,500 unique visitors to our two campuses The amount reflected as grants in Program Service 4a represent student stipends and amounts paid to local rural communities. Scholarship expenses are not recorded in the functional expenses of the Form 990.
Special Projects - In addition to its educational and agricultural activities, the University also undertakes special environmental projects at the behest of governmental entities and other organizations. Examples of such projects include: 1. The Aga Khan Network approached EARTH to become a partner in a project to reform the Bilibiza Technical Secondary School in Northern Mozambique and incorporate aspects of the EARTH educational model. Since then, retired EARTH professor, Panfilo Tabora has been contracted by the Aga Khan Network to promote entrepreneurship and agro-business in Mozambique. 2. The German Ministry of Environment financed a collaboration between EARTH University and the Renewables Academy in Berlin to promote renewable energy, including: the equipping of a laboratory, visiting professors and renewable energy training in Germany. 3. Earth's Community Development Program was created to give students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the field, apply theoretical concepts and develop the interpersonal communication skills that are essential for modern professional. Over the years, the Program has transformed into a mutually beneficial bridge between the University and nearby communities, allowing students to contribute to sustainable development while learning from the experience and the wisdom of the producers themselves. For more information about other projects in which the University is involved, please refer to the organization's website www.earth.ac.cr or its 2016 annual report (as published on its website). IN 2016, Earth Students and the community development program impacted more than 1,800 people in the nearby communities of La lucha and Santa rosa (rio jimenez), with dozens of trainings in agricultural best practices, food processing and entrepreneurship.
Program expenses$2,381,869.00$3,104,423.00$2,415,719.00
Grants and allocations made$0.00$0.00$0.00
Program revenue$2,006,586.00$1,002,334.00$1,889,874.00
Program descriptionSpecial Projects - In addition to its educational and agricultural activities, the University also undertakes special environmental projects at the behest of governmental entities and other organizations. Examples of such projects include: 1. The Aga Khan Network approached EARTH to become a partner in a project to reform the Bilibiza Technical Secondary School in Northern Mozambique and incorporate aspects of the EARTH educational model. Since then, retired EARTH professor, Panfilo Tabora has been contracted by the Aga Khan Network to promote entrepreneurship and agro-business in Mozambique. 2. The German Ministry of Environment financed a collaboration between EARTH University and the Renewables Academy in Berlin to promote renewable energy, including: the equipping of a laboratory, visiting professors and renewable energy training in Germany. 3. Earth's Community Development Program was created to give students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the field, apply theoretical concepts and develop the interpersonal communication skills that are essential for modern professional. Over the years, the Program has transformed into a mutually beneficial bridge between the University and nearby communities, allowing students to contribute to sustainable development while learning from the experience and the wisdom of the producers themselves. For more information about other projects in which the University is involved, please refer to the organization's website www.earth.ac.cr or its 2016 annual report (as published on its website). IN 2016, Earth Students and the community development program impacted more than 1,800 people in the nearby communities of La lucha and Santa rosa (rio jimenez), with dozens of trainings in agricultural best practices, food processing and entrepreneurship.Special Projects - In addition to its educational and agricultural activities, the University also undertakes special environmental projects at the behest of governmental entities and other organizations. Examples of such projects include: 1. The Aga Khan Network approached EARTH to become a partner in a project to reform the Bilibiza Technical Secondary School in Northern Mozambique and incorporate aspects of the EARTH educational model. Since then, retired EARTH professor, Panfilo Tabora has been contracted by the Aga Khan Network to promote entrepreneurship and agro-business in Mozambique. 2. The German Ministry of Environment financed a collaboration between EARTH University and the Renewables Academy in Berlin to promote renewable energy, including: the equipping of a laboratory, visiting professors and renewable energy training in Germany. For more information about other projects in which the University is involved, please refer to the organization's website www.earth.ac.cr or its 2015 annual report (as published on its website). 3. Earth's Community Development Program was created to give students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the field, apply theoretical concepts and develop the interpersonal communication skills that are essential for modern professional. Over the years, the Program has transformed into a mutually beneficial bridge between the University and nearby communities, allowing students to contribute to sustainable development while learning from the experience and the wisdom of the producers themselves. IN 2015, Earth Students and the community development program impacted more than 1,800 people in the nearby communities of La lucha and Santa rosa (rio jimenez), with dozens of trainings in agricultural best practices, food processing and entrepreneurship.Special Projects - In addition to its educational and agricultural activities, the University also undertakes special environmental projects at the behest of governmental entities and other organizations. Examples of such projects include: 1. The Aga Khan Network approached EARTH to become a partner in a project to reform the Bilibiza Technical Secondary School in Northern Mozambique and incorporate aspects of the EARTH educational model. Since then, retired EARTH professor, Panfilo Tabora has been contracted by the Aga Khan Network to promote entrepreneurship and agro-business in Mozambique. 2. The German Ministry of Environment financed a collaboration between EARTH University and the Renewables Academy in Berlin to promote renewable energy, including: the equipping of a laboratory, visiting professors and renewable energy training in Germany. For more information about other projects in which the University is involved, please refer to the organization's website www.earth.ac.cr or its 2014 annual report (as published on its website). 3. Earth's Community Development Program was created to give students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in the field, apply theoretical concepts and develop the interpersonal communication skills that are essential for modern professional. Over the years, the Program has transformed into a mutually beneficial bridge between the University and nearby communities, allowing students to contribute to sustainable development while learning from the experience and the wisdom of the producers themselves. IN 2014, Earth Students and the community development program impacted more than 2,500 people in the nearby communities of Las Lomas, Verdetica and El Triunfo, with dozens of trainings in agricultural best practices, food processing and entrepreneurship.
Financial data
Expense categories (totals)
Sum (total functional expenses)$34,222,341.00$32,473,707.00$29,567,854.00
Program services (total functional expenses)$28,214,320.00$26,529,761.00$24,183,458.00
Management & general (total functional expenses)$6,008,021.00$5,943,946.00$5,384,396.00
Fundraising (total functional expenses)$0.00$0.00$0.00
Revenue
Total revenue$31,487,072.00$34,614,649.00$30,123,725.00
Program service revenue (total)$25,319,805.00$21,454,110.00$20,694,387.00
Revenue from contributions (total)$1,926,591.00$3,400,605.00$1,832,723.00
Investment income$2,622,023.00$9,468,510.00$7,111,141.00
Total unrelated business revenue$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other revenue, current yr$1,618,653.00$291,424.00$485,474.00
Net unrelated business taxable revenue$0.00 $0.00
Total revenue from grants, etc., current yr$1,926,591.00$3,400,605.00$1,832,723.00
Gross receipts$31,487,072.00$34,614,649.00$30,123,725.00
Sources of contributions
Contributions from related organizations$1,496,055.00$2,580,813.00$1,233,340.00
Revenue from gov't grants $195,149.00$326,700.00
Revenue from all other contributions$430,536.00$624,643.00$272,683.00
Other types of revenue
Royalties (total)$0.00$0.00$67,471.00
Miscellaneous revenue (total)$1,618,653.00$291,424.00$418,003.00
Net revenue from gaming (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00
Income from dividends, interest, and similar investments$1,943,023.00$1,599,510.00$1,818,141.00
Net rental income$0.00$0.00$0.00
Net income from fundraising events$0.00$0.00$0.00
Net inventory sales (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00
Fees for services
Lobbying fees (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00
Legal fees (total)$273,847.00$97,493.00$89,246.00
Fundraising service fees (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00
General management fees (total)$368,770.00$153,861.00$104,480.00
Investment management fees (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00
Accounting service fees (total)$52,410.00$49,480.00$51,841.00
Assets and liabilities
Total assets$97,161,833.00$98,761,595.00$109,893,315.00
Total assets, beginning of year$98,761,595.00$109,893,315.00$112,882,218.00
Total liabilities$14,847,359.00$12,980,658.00$14,073,920.00
Total liabilities, beginning of year$12,980,658.00$14,073,920.00$13,326,962.00
Pledges & accounts receivable, net$0.00$0.00$0.00
Loans & receivables from key persons$0.00$0.00$0.00
Net assets$82,314,474.00$85,780,937.00$95,819,395.00
Net assets, beginning of year$85,780,937.00$95,819,395.00$99,555,256.00
Other liabilities$188,704.00$177,251.00$144,612.00
Bond liabilities$0.00$0.00$0.00
Intangible assets$0.00$0.00$0.00
Other assets$3,971,145.00$7,409,567.00$6,693,543.00
Investments: other securities$0.00$0.00$0.00
Investments: publicly traded securities$64,162,878.00$65,748,886.00$75,632,277.00
Cash: non-interest bearing$7,092.00$8,024.00$8,154.00
Cash: non-interest bearing, beginning of year$8,024.00$8,154.00$8,133.00
Investments: program-related$0.00$0.00$0.00
Escrow or custodial account liability$0.00$0.00$0.00
Loans and other payables to key persons$0.00$0.00$0.00
Grants payable$0.00$0.00$0.00
Inventories for sale or use$389,682.00$368,950.00$380,358.00
Other financial variables
Revenue less expenses-$2,735,269.00$2,140,942.00$555,871.00
Advertising (total)$0.00$0.00$0.00
Savings & temp cash investment$5,099,270.00$4,621,095.00$5,487,081.00
Accounts receivable, net$649,609.00$1,055,039.00$864,631.00
Prepaid expenses & deferred charges$171,835.00$156,616.00$189,676.00
Accounts payable & accrued expenses$2,911,263.00$3,197,010.00$2,963,193.00
Deferred revenue$8,740,783.00$6,767,874.00$7,543,702.00
Unsecured notes & loans to unrelated parties$0.00$0.00$0.00
Secured mortgages and notes payable$3,006,609.00$2,838,523.00$3,422,413.00
Total net assets or fund balances$82,314,474.00$85,780,937.00$95,819,395.00
Depreciation, depletion, amortization$1,256,733.00$899,334.00$877,198.00
Payment to affiliates$0.00$0.00$0.00
Governance and accountability
Number of voting members121212
Number of independent voting members121212
Financial sheets auditedTrueTrueTrue
Audit on consolidated basisTrueTrueTrue
Tax year start date2016-01-012015-01-012014-01-01
Tax year end date2016-12-312015-12-312014-12-31
Accounting methodAccrualAccrualAccrual
Indicators for schedules (selected)
Grants to domestic org/gov't >$5kTrueTrueTrue
Metadata about the filing
E-return type990990990
Date e-filing submitted2017-12-212017-02-062016-01-12
IRS schema version2016v3.12015v2.12014v5.0
Filing identifier201703059349300020201623069349300122201512789349300856
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